Tangled Tales – Now Over 200 Short Stories – Written By Juliette Kings

Today I found a great blog post on the ‘Vampire Maman’s blog: A list with 200 of her short stories! What an amazing list! She even added a few short stories from other authors (including mine) but that’s only a detail. Thanks so much, Juliette! I read so many of them. But I sure will find the one or the other to refresh my memory!


 

Short Stories from Vampire Maman

A good portion of the posts on Vampiremaman.com read like short stories, but the list here is of stand alone stories that don’t necessarily follow the tales of Juliette’s life with her husband, kids and assorted Vampire Mom adventures.

Expect the unexpected … and a lot of fun! Click on the title to go to the story.

You’ll find Vampire, parenting, Gothic romance, horror, humor, urban fantasy, science fiction, odd ditties, literary fiction, and other unique and unexpected tangled tales. This isn’t the complete list but it will keep you busy for a while. Keep checking back for more.

* Guest authors  

  1. Dancing on the Beach
  2. Morning in the Vineyard
  3. When You Grow Old
  4. A Man Should Have What He Wants
  5. Ode to a Greek God
  6. The Alley
  7. Off to See the Wizard
  8. Baker Beach
  9. The Necklace (My Christmas Necklace)
  10. The Travelers
  11. Captain Sandy and the Airship at the End of the World
  12. Perfection
  13. The Shadow of Fire
  14. Robert and the Key *
  15. Dark Politics
  16. Romance of the Needles

CONTINUE READING HERE

Free Short Story: Everyone Deserves A Second Chance – Written By Nicholas C. Rossis

Today I discovered a free short story on Nicholas Rossi’s blog. I was fascinated and loved it enormously. I, therefore, hope he’ll permit me to show you a very small part of it – and link you to his page. Enjoy the read.


Waters of Oblivion

While I wait for you, I take in the beach. This is my home. The deep, calm sea—too dark to make out anything but the soothing waves that lap my feet. Dark silhouettes surround me. They would crowd the beach, were it not for its immensity. Old and young, men and women, take slow, dazed steps into the abysmal waters. Guides like me help them in. Not that you need us for this. Ancient, forgotten instincts would drive you forward even if we weren’t there. But we pride ourselves in that special, personal touch.

Smaller, translucent silhouettes come out of the sea, too, like baby turtles going the wrong way. Other guides are there to take them to their new homes. You will be following them in no time.

And now you’re finally here. When I left you at your bedroom after you had swallowed all those pills, I was wondering how long it would take you to join me. Not that time matters. Not here, anyway.

You shudder after the unpleasant experience of going through the death portal. “What… what happened?” you ask.

“You got what you wanted,” I say. “Congratulations. You’re dead.”

Continue Reading HERE

 

Don’t Describe, Paint Pictures With Words

Picture courtesy of: https://medium.com/@Reedsy/30-inspiring-writing-quotes-from-famous-authors-ca601bfa5915

When I read this quote I ‘clicked’ immediately with these words; even more since I keep saying that I enjoy painting pictures with words. In my writing exactly that’s what I try to do, even though I’m not always sure it works the way I had planned it.

My back was turned to the door. While I waited for his return, I watched the sparrows playing on the fountain rim while taking quick showers in the droplets which sparkled in the bright afternoon sun.

seems to be better than:

I stared outside waiting for his return. The afternoon sun made the water in the fountain basin sparkle.

I would like the reader to see the sparrows hopping around, rant and rave at each other and still spread the feeling of happiness and joy.

I figure we all had looked out a window once when the weather was beautiful and saw some pond or fountain. Sparrows are almost everywhere, but most of us don’t see them anymore, maybe because they are ‘ordinary.’

Of course, this is only one example of many. I am fascinated by waterfalls in the mountains and I know I’m not the only one. But how many of us see the rainbow over the water in summer, how many see the snakes, turtles, and lizards which can be seen enjoying the sun while still trying to catch the droplets the waterfall bestows on them.

Many people like going for walks. But it seems to be very important to them to permanently stare onto their phones or have someone with them to talk to.

That way they miss the sound of Nature, they miss so many beautiful details.
When I go through the forest, I try to set my steps as quietly as possible as compared to breaking through the woods like a rhinoceros. I watch the sunbeams touching the moss between trees; I listen to the birds singing, I can see the finest art in the form of spider webs between the bushes (and yes, I walk around them. As beautiful as the webs are, the residents scare me to death).

I have the chance to see foxes, squirrels, and deer. One evening I had the chance to watch a huge owl feeding the brood, and I’m still honored to have had that chance.

All these details taught me how to see. And that is what I try to express in my books. Of course, I still work on it, and I’m sure at times it can be better. But I won’t give up.

How is your experience with descriptions and the painting of pictures with words? Let me know in the comments below.


Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was born on January 29th in the year 1860, in the small seaport of Taganrog, Ukraine. He is regarded as one of Russia’s most cherished story tellers. He has produced some hilarious one-acts, but his tragic stories have gained him the name of being one of the major dramatists. Today, he is remembered as a playwright and one of the masters of the modern short story. He was the grandson of a serf and the son of a grocer, whose religious fanaticism caused much of his early years to reside under its shadow. While he was doing medicine in the University of Moscow, he began writing short stories. After graduating in 1884, he worked as a freelance writer and journalist related to comics. He used the money gathered from it to support himself and his family, and by 1886, he had gained wide fame as a writer. Chekhov’s works were published in various St. Petersburg papers, including Peterburskaia Gazeta in 1885, and Novoe Vremia in 1886. The Shooting Party published by him was translated into English in 1926.

In the early part of his career, he mastered the art of one-act and produced some fine pieces. In 1888, he wrote a story, The Bear, in which a creditor pursues a young widow, but later proposes marriage to her after being impressed that she’s agreed to fight a duel with him. In 1889, he wrote The Wedding, which also has a very nice story attached to it, and became an instant hit amongst his fans.

In 1886, he began contributing regularly to St. Petersburg daily Novoe Vremia and that was when he developed the style of calm writing. He was criticized by his opponents because his story lacked social commentary, but at the same time, he was praised by authors such as Leo Tolstoy and Nikolai Leskov.
In 1888, Chekhov was rewarded the Pushkin Prize and the very next year, he was elected a member of the Society of Lovers of Russian Literature. He withdrew from Literature and turned to Science for a while when his play, The Wood Demon failed in 1889. As a part of his doctoral research, he made a trip to the penal colony of Sakhalin, north of Siberia, where he surveyed 10,000 convicts sentenced to life on the island. During the latter half of the year, he traveled all over the word, including places as South East Asia, the Indian Subcontinent, and the Middle East.
In 1901, Chekhov finally married an actress, Olga Knipper, who had performed in his plays. On July 15, 1904, in Badenweiler, Germany, Chekhov died. He is buried in the cemetery of the Novodeviche Monastery in Moscow. (Source: https://www.famousauthors.org/anton-chekhov)

Why Writing Short Stories Help You – Written By Rachel Poli

Last week I found an interesting blog post on Rachel Poli’s blog, where she explains why writing short stories helps writers. Thank you very much for sharing your knowledge and insight.


I didn’t start to appreciate writing short stories until fairly recently. I always viewed short stories as something “quick and easy” to write. Of course, they’re not easy to write at all. Just because they can be 5,000 words as opposed to 50,000 words doesn’t mean it’s faster or easier. Another thing I thought was that writing novels was “better” for your writing. I figured the more I write, the more I would improve. Writing one long story isn’t the only way to “write more” though.

Short Stories Help You Tighten Your Words

One great thing about short stories is that it helps you learn how to tighten your words. It’s easy to ramble and to describe something that doesn’t matter. Especially if you’re just trying to get the words down, it’s super easy to get excited about quantity over quality.

To read the entire blog post go to:

https://rachelpoli.com/2019/02/19/why-writing-short-stories-help-you/

September And October 2018 Writing Submissions [Writing Contests] – by Rachel Poli

Thank you again, Rachel Poli, for your efforts to inform us of the writing contests the current and next months. We really appreciate it!


September 2018

Genre: Any – see website for list (Book must be self-published)
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: September 4, 2018
Entry Fee: $125
Prize: Grand – $5,000

Genre: Any – see website for list
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: September 14, 2018 (early-bird)
Entry Fee: $25
Prize: Grand – $2,500

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: Mom Knows Best
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: September 30, 2018
Entry Fee: N/A
Prize: $200

Read the entire blog post here:

https://rachelpoli.com/2018/09/05/september-and-october-2018-writing-submissions-writing-contests/

 

Short Story/Serial Monday – First Impressions – The Conclusion

Find here Don Massenzio’s conclusion to his serial, First Impressions, as posted on his author blog.

Author Don Massenzio

Well, this serial came to a natural end in this week’s installment. I was able to end it to my satisfaction and give it a subtle tie to one of my other serials as well as mix in some call backs to my third Frank Rozzani novel.

I’ve enjoyed writing this serial and look forward to putting it together with other related short stories in a super-sized book.

On a side note, I’ve updated my Author Directory and Serial pages. You can now find all  the authors I’ve interviewed over the past 3 years and the serials that I’ve written, two of which have become books this year.

Please enjoy this last installment of First Impressions.


Couple Holding Hands at Sea Sunset

What in the world was Jones up to? He gave no clues for the four digit code. He had somehow put a virus on an air-gapped server, one that was not directly connected to…

View original post 1,661 more words

Short Story/Serial Monday – Memories of Rachel – Part 1

Don Massenzio started a new series. This sounds very intriguing!

Author Don Massenzio

It’s so funny how things happen. Last week, I wrapped up a long serial and convinced myself that I was going to write a couple of short stories before I dove headfirst into another serial.

To paraphrase, writers plan and muses laugh. This story had been rattling around in my head for a while. I read Dan Brown’s latest book, Origin, recently and it dabbles with artificial intelligence and somewhat predicts future fusion of humans and technology.

I decided to take that idea and go in a different direction. This story has a basis in something that I actually witnessed in real life. We have an acquaintance that became pregnant with a child and was then diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer. She made the selfless decision to forego treatment so she could deliver a healthy child. As a result, she was debilitated by the cancer and…

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September/October 2017 Writing Contests

Thanks to Rachel Poli’s efforts we are updated once again on the upcoming September/October 2017 writing contests. Thank you so much Rachel!

Rachel Poli

September/October 2017 writing contest deadlinesSeptember 2017

Genre: Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, or Poetry
Theme: None
Website: Still: The Journal
Deadline: September 9, 2017
Entry Fee: $12
Prize: First – $200

Genre: Essay
Theme: None
Website: Literal Latte
Deadline: September 30, 2017
Entry Fee: $10/1 essay or $15/2 essays
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: My Crazy Family
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: September 30, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

October 2017

Genre: Poetry
Theme: N/A
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: (Early bird) October 2, 2017
Entry Fee: $15
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Popular fiction (romance, YA, thriller, crime, horror, sci-fi)
Theme: N/A
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: (Early bird) October 16, 2017
Entry Fee: $20
Prize: First – $2,500

Genre: Fiction
Theme: Short story (new writers only)
Website: Glimmer Train
Deadline: October 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $18
Prize: First – $2,500

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: Christmas and Holiday
Website: Chicken Soup for the…

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“A Guide to Short Story Contests in 2017”

Alexander M Zoltai published a post leading to the Aerogramme Writers’ Studio’s “A guide to Short Story Contests in 2017”.

Thank you very much Alexander!

Notes from An Alien

Short Story Contests 2017

This would normally be a re-blog day; but, Aerogramme Writers’ Studio published A Guide to Short Story Contests in 2017.

Since some of the contests have deadlines in January, I thought it needed published here today 🙂
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