New scam – BEWARE!

Thank you very much for the warning, Meeks! I spread word about it, it’s important that as many people as possible learn where to find the hints to recognize scam! We appreciate your work!

Meeka's Mind

I found this email in my inbox last night:

I took a screenshot and deleted personal stuff so you could see what it looks like.

Firstly, how did I know this was a scam? Simple – I don’t use Microsoft OneDrive. I have NEVER used OneDrive.

Next, if you look at the email sender it says:

’email@mail.onedrive.com’

Not even a hint of Microsoft anywhere. ‘mail.onedrive’ is a domain that has nothing to do with Microsoft. [When you register a domain, no one else can use it. But there is nothing to stop someone from registering a domain that ‘hints’ at belonging to a well known company].

And finally, do you see the big, red ‘YOU’? I put that in to highlight the poor grammar used in the body of the email. You won’t always find poor grammar, but when you do, it’s a dead giveaway. Whoever set up this scam…

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How To Manage Contact Form And Spam Comments On Your Site – by Derek Haines…

The Story Reading Ape’s blog showed me another article written by Derek Haines, this time about reducing spam on our blog. Thank you very much for sharing, Chris and Derek!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on Just Publishing Advice:

Learn how you can better control and manage comments on your blog

You work hard to build your blog and increase social media and organic traffic from search engines.

But one symptom of your success is going to be a lot more blog comment spam and unwanted contact form messages.

As your site ranking improves, you will start to get noticed by genuine content marketers, as well as spammers.

SEO tracking software is now very sophisticated, and when it notices your site improvement, it will add it automatically to a list of potential backlink prospects.

Reputable marketers use this data to pinpoint who they can contact to improve content, backlinks and sales potential.

But spammers and scammers use these automated tools to hit hundreds or thousands of sites.

Continue reading HERE

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Akismet – Or the Secret Infiltration Of Our Blogs

A few weeks back I was going through my comments, since I had to approve a few of them, and was informed that I had something like 70 spam comments. You can see the spam file here, just when you’re in your comments:

Once again curiosity-driven I went through the spam file and scrolled through the different attempts. And I realized something: while a few months ago, these ‘cyber-impostors” were simply commenting on our blog posts, they had found out they might be more successful replying to one of the comments on our posts.

While a year ago, sales companies for mattresses, online drug stores, and internet Viagra were trying to use our blogs as a sales platform, this time I found that Russian sex sites tried the same thing.

I saw the statistics and realized that the number of spam comments was almost as high as my regular blog comments. Can you imagine if Akismet didn’t exist? We would be drowned in mattresses, bad internet Viagra and Russian whores.

 

I admit at this point I’m grateful for Akismet and WordPress protecting us from the worst. Some trigger words might make them turn a regular comment into a spam comment, but by going through our spam file regularly, we can still catch them.

Without Akismet our blogs were unreadable, and we would have to give them up.
I recommend you keep track of your spam folder to help them improve their service.

Happy blogging!

picture courtesy of http://www.twitter.com