Scheduling can be Relaxed and Still Effective! #TimeManagement – Written By Renee Scattergood

I discovered an excellent article on time management on Renee Scattergood’s blog. Renee is a Dark Speculative Fiction author who published the ‘Shadow Stalker’ books. Thanks for a very educational post, Renee.


One of the biggest obstacles I have (and I’m sure you do as well) is time. Since I can’t stop the clock and give myself the time I need to get things done, I have to make the best use I can of the time I have.

It’s not an easy thing to do when you have a special needs kid who has to be homeschooled due to medical issues who requires much more attention and help than most kids her age. It’d nearly impossible to find time to get things done when I want to write, but I also have a home to run. Then throw my own health issues into the mix, and forget it.

When my daughter was little, I had given up trying. I just couldn’t seem to find the time or energy to keep up with everything. I refused to give up completely though. Writing is something I truly love, and I want to make a career of it. The last thing I wanted was to look back on my life and regret never giving it a go.

So I found ways to work around all my obstacles, including time!

The most effective way to manage time is to have a schedule, but schedules have never worked for me. There are too many variables in my day to stick to one. I never know when my daughter is going to need me for something, so I can’t plan for those, and she has to come first before everything when it comes to her mental health.

Continue Reading HERE

 

When is the Best Time of Year to Release a Book?

Provided by Self Publishing Review

In Hollywood, there’s a pretty set calendar for when movies are released: horror movies are usually released around Halloween, high-concept blockbusters in the summer, Oscar movies start in November, movies that aren’t blockbusters or Oscar contenders in February.

Does the book trade follow the same release schedule?

The answer is, more or less, yes.

Continue reading HERE

Ageing. The inevitable truth. – Written By Barbara Rogers

I saw this amazing, truthful and in many ways memorable blog post on the “Barbara Bear” blog, written by Barbara Rogers. Thank you very much for sharing your thoughts on a subject many of us have problems with.


I saw this picture recently. It made me think. A lot. In the end I decided that it is such a beautiful, and poignant depiction of old age. One I had hoped to aspire to …. but now unlikely to achieve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what did I see?? I didn’t read the words at first, as I wanted to form my own opinion. Yes… we are permitted to have our own bleddy opinions!!

To read the entire blog post go to:

Ageing. The inevitable truth.

 

20 Book Marketing Ideas That Take 10 Minutes Or Less – Written By Jenn Hanson-DePaula

Jenn Hanson-DePaula of Mixtus Media provides us with 20 book marketing ideas that don’t take too much time. I’m sure I’m not the only one grateful for this information. Thank you Jenn!


If there is one common thread that runs through every author it’s this: we don’t have enough time!

Sometimes when we see a huge task ahead of us, like book marketing, we tend to focus on it as a whole. And that can be overwhelming – which can make many of us put it off for another day, or just give up on it all together.

But when we break it down a bit, there is actually a lot we can get done in just a few minutes a day.

So I thought I would share some tasks that take 10 minutes or less that will vastly improve your book marketing.

These are tasks that can be done quickly during your lunch break, while you’re waiting in line to pick up your kids from school, or even during commercials breaks while watching your favorite show. It helps you get things done – and each task usually takes less time than you thought.

  1. Research hashtags. Think about keywords your ideal reader would use to find your book. For example, #ya, #mysterybooks or #novels. When you search that hashtag, more suggestions will be offered. Keep a running list of those hashtags and start using them in your posts or start liking and commenting on posts that use those hashtags as well. Your engagement and audience will grow! You can get your list started by downloading our free hashtag list.

Continue reading the entire blog post HERE

 

 

Writers: Don’t Use Up Your Word Count on Internet Rants – written by Bryn Donovan

Recently a writer I know talked about not getting sucked into an online argument with a stranger, “because your girl doesn’t work for free.” I was nodding in agreement.

I cut way, way back on Internet arguments and rants a few years ago. I felt like the habit could make anger or bitterness my default setting, and I didn’t want that. I didn’t see a lot of minds being changed, anyway, so I doubted whether it was really worth it. Internet arguments seemed to yield a truly miserable return on investment.

But every week, millions of writers and other creative people are working for free.
They’re putting in hours of careful thought for online arguments and lectures.

In online communities, sometimes you’ll see a truly epic argument thread. (Once I witnessed one in a “private” Facebook group, and soon after, sections of it were printed verbatim in an article in a major magazine.)

In these threads, one person posts something, and another person disagrees. Before long, some people are posting walls of text that could pass for op ed columns, while others are posting snappy insults and collecting verbal high fives for their wit.

Dozens of people may be involved in the thread. If they were getting paid, it would represent hundreds of dollars’ worth of work.

To continue reading this post, please go to:

http://www.bryndonovan.com/2018/02/27/writers-dont-use-up-your-word-count-on-internet-rants/#respond