Writing Tips: Eliminate Redundancies in Your Writing – by Melissa Donovan

Melissa Donovan published a very educational blog post about the elimination of redundancies in our writing. Thank you very much for your hard work, Melissa. That post is very helpful!


Writers are human, and sometimes we make mistakes. You’re probably aware of the most common mistakes in writing: comma splices, run-on sentences, mixing up homophones, and a variety of other broken grammar, spelling, and punctuation rules.

In my coaching work, I’ve noticed another common mistake: redundancy. Sometimes we use repetition effectively, but most of the time, by saying the same thing twice, we’re littering our writing with unnecessary language, or verbiage. If we remove the excess, we can improve our writing by making it more concise.

Understanding and Identifying Redundancies in Writing

Dictionary.com defines redundancy as a noun meaning “superfluous repetition or overlapping, especially of words.” Its cousin, the adjective redundant, means “characterized by verbosity or unnecessary repetition in expressing ideas” or “exceeding what is usual or natural.”

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Surprising Uses for Business Cards – Written By Joan Reeves

Author Joan Reeves provides us with a phenomenal idea on her blog: different, surprising and extraordinary uses for business cards. Thanks so much for this post, Joan!


I still carry business cards. Do you?

Actually, I carry several cards that are standard business-card size, that is, 3.5 inches” x 2 inches.

Only 1 of these cards I carry is a traditional business card. That’s it to the left. On the reverse side of it, I have my website and blog links.

If you’re wondering why an author should carry business cards, this post is for you.

I order my cards from Vista Print because they offer quality card stock, they’re inexpensive, and I can upload my own design or use one of theirs. The card above is an old one, and it uses one of their stock designs.

If you want something even more affordable, print your own with Avery Clean Edge Business Card.

Just be sure you get the correct ones for your printer. Also, keep it simple if you’re not skilled at graphic design.

To read the entire blog post go to:

http://slingwords.blogspot.com/2019/02/surprising-uses-for-business-cards.html

Characterization Tips – Part II – Written By Don Massenzio

February 9, 2019 I published Don Massenzio’s first part of characterization tips. Naturally I will share the second part as well. Thank you very much, Don!


Yesterday, I wrote a post about characterization listing, in simple terms, some of the pitfalls that writers face as they create and develop characters. You can read it HERE. This post will revisit those pitfalls and give you some tips on how to repair them.

These are all practical lessons that I learned as I stumbled my way through seven books with two more on the way. I hope that you find them helpful. I appreciate the kind words and discussion after the first post.

Now, let’s revisit some of the issues identified in the last post with some potential solutions.

Continue reading the entire blog post here:

https://donmassenzio.wordpress.com/2019/02/07/characterization-tips-part-ii/

7 Tips for Writing Fantasy – Written By Nicholas Rossis

On Nicholas Rossis’ blog I found an article by “Reedsy”, providing us with 7 tips for writing fantasy. Thanks a lot for your efforts to share this information, Nicholas! We really appreciate it!


Reedsy recently published some great tips for fantasy authors–tips which can be easily applied to any fiction writing. Here is my summary of a selection of these tips.

1. Identify your Market

If you think it’s enough to say, “oh, I write fantasy,” think again. With so many fantasy genres, readers tend to cluster around specific subgenres which can range from Harry Potter to steampunk and Young Adult.

2. Use Short Stories

This was a great tip, reminding us of the value of short stories to flesh out our world and characters. When you write these with the specific aim of excluding them from your novels, you will find that you have more creative freedom and can discover surprising things about your universe.

Continue reading the article on Nicholas Rossis’ blog here:

https://nicholasrossis.wordpress.com/2019/02/05/7-tips-for-writing-fantasy/

Abbreviations We Use All The Time But Don’t Know The Meaning – By Derek Haines

We use abbreviations and acronyms all the time, but what do they mean?

The English language uses many forms of word abbreviation.

We use shortened forms increasingly for text messaging to reduce a word or phrase.

Very often these are acronyms using initial letters such as LOL, ROTFL and BRB.

Other forms also use a capital letter from the start of each word but are pronounced as words. A good example is the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, which forms the word, NATO.

Other examples are NASA, POTUS and SCUBA. If you didn’t know, SCUBA means self-contained underwater breathing apparatus. Radar is also an acronym, derived from radio detection and ranging.

Many common abbreviations, however, are pronounced letter by letter. The United States of America is most commonly referred to as the US or the USA, the United Kingdom as the UK and the United Nations as the UN.

To read the entire blog post go to:

https://justpublishingadvice.com/abbreviations-we-use-all-the-time-but-dont-know-the-meaning/

Are You a Prolific Author? – Written By Don Massenzio

Don Massenzio wrote an educational blog post about being a prolific author – and useful writing techniques everyone of us should know. Thank you very much, Don!


When you think of prolific authors, who comes to mind. I immediately thought of Stephen King, Dean Koontz and James Patterson. In reality, these authors are small fries when it comes to being prolific. Stephen King himself said he was considered to be prolific despite having written “only” a few dozen novels to date. He also stated that some renowned novelists have written fewer than five books in a career. His quote on this was, “…I always wonder two things about these folks: how long did it take them to write the books they did write, and what did they do with the rest of their time?”

What about you my fellow authors and bloggers? Are you trying to write the one great American novel like To Kill a Mockingbird?

I started writing my first published book five years ago. Since then, I have published eight fictional novels, a book of short stories and a non-fiction books. I guess that’s considered prolific. But I also have some secrets that helped me get there quickly. They’re not really secrets, but useful techniques. Here are some of them.

To continue reading this post go to:

https://donmassenzio.wordpress.com/2019/01/14/are-you-a-prolific-author-2/

How Celebrating Diversity Can Make Your Ad Campaigns Better – By Nicholas Rossis

Nicholas Rossis advices us to celebrate diversity to make our ad campaigns better. Thank you very much for all your information and help, Nicholas!


Diversity and identity politics can be a minefield. In my science fantasy series, Pearseus, I had as diverse a cast as possible, with strong female leads, a main hero of Indian descent, another one of Chinese descent, Masai warriors, a lesbian leader, etc. Even so, I got flak from people who felt their preferred minority was underrepresented because, for example, my warrior heroines were slim and slender (even though one of my favorite characters, Head Priestess Tie, was a big woman with a shaved head).

So, should we, as authors, shy away from diversity?

In one word, no. With Pearseus, I didn’t set off to create a diverse cast; it came about organically as that was simply what fit my characters. I seem to have an eye for the quirky and the unusual when people-watching and that shows in my own work. And I find it boring when I write stories with only one kind of heroes.

But I had never thought of a possible relationship between my Ad campaign and diversity.

To continue reading the entire post, please go to:

https://nicholasrossis.wordpress.com/2019/01/07/how-celebrating-diversity-can-make-your-ad-campaigns-better/

70 Conversation Starters for Social Media Engagement

Jenn Hanson-dePaula of Mixtus Media provides us with a great article on conversation started for social media. Thank you Jenn!


Have you ever posted something on social media and nothing happens? You might feel like it’s a waste of time because no one ever responds to what you post. Or maybe you feel like you’re just contributing to the noise online and everyone simply tunes you out.

Social media outlets have hundreds of millions of users worldwide, and each outlet wants their users to see posts that they will find interesting. So to make this possible, they use something called algorithms.

An algorithm is like a filter – it keeps the posts that people aren’t responding to out while letting the popular posts through.

So how do you actually get your posts seen and in your audience’s news feed? One effective and simple way to do that is by asking questions that require a quick and easy answer.

Most people are scrolling through their news feed very quickly. But if something catches their eye and doesn’t require a lot of time or thought, they will most likely respond.

The more likes, comments, shares, retweets, etc., your post gets, the algorithms will see that people are interested and will make your post more visible.

To continue reading this post go to:

70 Conversation Starters for Social Media Engagement

 

13 Free Blogging Tips For Every New Blogger

Hugh provides us with 13 free blogging tips for every new blogger. Thanks so much for this post, Hugh!

Hugh's Views & News  

If you are new to blogging or are even thinking about starting a blog, here my thirteen quick blogging tips to get you on your way.

  • It’s all about me. Ensure you have an ‘about me’ page. Tell visitors a little about yourself and at least give them a name by which they can call you. However, don’t have an ‘about me’ page that starts off by saying ‘This Is An Example Of An About Me Page’. Click here to read about setting up an ‘about me’ page and what it should include.
  • Make a journey outside of your own blog. I’ve always been amazed by just what information is out there in the blogging world. I’ve learned how to self-publishing a book, how to use social media and make it work for me, how to bake gin & tonic cupcakes, take great photos and, of course, picked up lots…

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