Navigating websites isn’t always smooth sailing – written by Julianne Rigali

The Authors Community Website provides us with a great blog post by Julianne Rigali about Websites and how to navigate them. It’s not always easy. Thank you Julianne!


Designing Your Navigation Menu

Before you start design on your website, the second thing to do: You should layout your navigation menu for website navigation. (Wondering about the first thing…that’s for an upcoming post…stay tuned.)

First, use a piece of paper, a blackboard, or a dry erase board.

Second, jot down what your website will offer your readers.

Will you have a blog?
An “about me” page?
A page with excerpts from your writings?
A bookshop page?
A photo gallery?
Are you a guest speaker?
Do you offer any services?
Will you have a Media/PR page?
Giving Back/Charity page?
Other

To continue reading the entire article, go to:

Authors Community – Navigating Websites


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Titles – How Important Are They and How Do You Come Up With Them?

Author Don Massenzio informs us about title and how important they are. Thank you for this great article, Don!

Author Don Massenzio

Many authors who write book series, James Patterson, Janet Evanovich and Sue Grafton, to name a few, have written books that have common words in them. Patterson uses the word ‘Cross’, as in his character, Alex Cross, in such books as Cross My Heart, Cross Country, etc. Interestingly enough, however, he started out titling his Alex Cross books with nursery rhyme references like Along Came a Spider and Jack and Jill. 

Janet Evanovich uses numbers for her Stephanie Plum novels. She started with One for the Money and is about to release Hardcore Twenty Four. Sue Grafton used the more limiting letter scheme for her titles. Starting with A is for Alibi, she is now about to release Y is for Yesterday. Having titles like these for a series is a great marketing idea and, in the case of Evanovich and Grafton, it gives you an idea…

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