Traditionally publishing? Yes, you still need to do marketing – Written By Ari Meghlen

Ari Meghlen informs us about book marketing and that you still have to do marketing even when you’re traditionally published. Thanks so much, Ari!


This post has been churning in my head for a while. I’ve had a number of writers tell me openly that they want to go traditionally published so they “don’t have to do marketing”.

There are many good reasons to go the traditionally published route, unfortunately, this is not one of them. Gone are the days when a traditionally published author would get to sit back and let the publishing house sort all the marketing.

There is no right or wrong answer regarding how to get published, you have to make your own decisions about what works best for you. Yet knowing what each option entitles is important as both have their own pros and cons.

However, the biggest thing I see is people believing that they don’t have to market if they go traditional and so blatantly ignore all opportunities to build their platform.

If you want to go traditional, you should at least be aware of the industry and what is expected of you.

To continue reading this blog post, go to Ari Meghlen’s blog on:

Traditionally publishing? Yes, you still need to do marketing.

Why Publish Your Novel with a Traditional Publisher?

On The Story Reading Ape’s blog I found a blog post, written by Randy on ‘advancedfictionwriting’. I found it very interesting and found more people should read the post. Thank you, Randy.


Are you about to publish your novel? If so, should you try going with a traditional publisher, or should you go indie? How do you make that decision?

Lynne posted this question on my “Ask A Question For My Blog” page:

I’m planning to go indie with my WIP. It’s only my second novel, I’m still a newbie, but here’s the question: what are the biggest reasons for seeking an agent and/or traditional publisher?

There are a number of obvious negatives associated with traditional publishing, such as low royalty rates. And I’ll have to do much of my own marketing even if my manuscript is accepted. I’d also like to do my own kindle pricing, something I can only do as an indie.

Thoughts? I want to know both sides before committing to my course.

Randy sez: Lynne, I have a feeling your question is much bigger than a single blog post can handle. I’m pretty sure I could write a whole book on the subject, and maybe someday I will. But you’ve got to make a decision right now, so I’ll try to boil things down a bit.

 

To read the entire article, please go to:

https://www.advancedfictionwriting.com/blog/2018/04/15/why-publish-novel-traditional-publisher/

 

Advantages and Disadvantages of Self-Publishing

Ruth Nestvold provides us on her blog with the advantages and disadvantages of self publishing. Thank you Ruth. This is very interesting and to many of us very useful.

Ruth Nestvold - Indie Adventures

Advantages and Disadvantages of Self-Publishing

I am finally (finally!) compiling my “Starting Out as an Indie Author” series into a book, and since I started this weekend, I’ve noticed a couple of things I still need to add. Since the first part of the book revolves around the question, “Is Self-Publishing For You?” I realized I had to write my own version of the consideration of the pros and cons of indie and traditional publishing. (I have a few more things up my sleeve that I will probably blog about in the next week or two.)

So with no further ado, here’s my take on the debate:

Advantages of Self Publishing

– Speed

A traditionally published novel can easily take up to two years from the time it is accepted to the time it actually comes out. And that isn’t even counting the years of sending the manuscript out to agents and editors.

By comparison…

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To Self-Publish or Try the Publishing Option? That is the Question…

Silver Threading published an important blog post about the two options an author has: choosing self publishing or a traditional publisher? The article provides us with very important information and is worth reading!

Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry

Image Credit: Randomhousebooks.com/hydra

Last week I came across an article about Hydra, a digital-first imprint of Random House. Here is the link to read the article. Hydra is reported as presenting the next generation of science fiction, fantasy, and horror who says: “Every title is available for purchase at major e-retailers and compatible with all reading devices.”

The interesting thing was, the article opened up a dialog about the options writers have in releasing their books to the public. It then becomes all about traditional publishing and independent publishing. Trying to figure out what is best for you is sometimes hard.

I am lucky to have built up a friendship with Lyz Russo, an accomplished author and the owner of an Indy Publishing company called P’kaboo Publishers. As a novice author, writing my first novel, I wanted to hear what choices I had available to me. There are…

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American English, British English, Canadian English… which to use for your book?

Roz Morris has shared an amazing blog post she wrote about the differences between American, British, Canadian and Australian English. I thought it was informative and useful! Thank you, Roz!

Nail Your Novel

w&alogotomayto tomato what brand of English should you useYesterday I spoke at the Writers & Artists self-publishing conference, and one of the attendees raised this subject… which led to an interesting debate.

First of all, does it matter if your editor is American, British, Canadian, Australian, or any other flavour of English?

Not for developmental editing, because that’s about the substance of the book. The editor won’t be recommending line corrections or studying your phrasing or grammar (although they might remark on it).

But in copy editing and proofreading, your use of language will be under scrutiny. That’s where you need an editor in tune with your territory. (Here’s a post on the different editorial processes and the order to do them.)

You say tomayto…

In case you’re wondering, there is far more difference than spellings and vocab. I’m a thoroughly Brit speaker, and I couldn’t copy-edit or proof a US book. Or an Australian book…

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Goodbye Traditional, Hello Indie (Part II)

January 20, 2016 I re-blogged a post, written by D. Wallace Peach, “Goodbye traditional, Hello Indie – Part I”. I thought it would be a great thing to re-blog the second part as well, which is just as greatly written! Thank you D. Wallace Peach!

Myths of the Mirror

printing2

Part I of this blog summary focused on my personal experience contracting with a small press. On the whole, it was a valuable learning experience, especially for a new author who knew nothing about anything. My publisher treated me fairly and respectfully, I improved my craft and happily published 6 books. For many authors, this approach may be the perfect publishing route.

Yet, publishing through a small press has significant challenges that are worth considering. As I gained knowledge and skills, it became clear to me that the obstacles outpaced the advantages. In 2015, I experimented and self-published 2 books. The results drove home the stark differences in the two approaches.

In December, I decided to go all indie. I began the process of canceling contracts with my publisher and reclaiming my books with the intention of republishing them myself.

Below, I explain my reasons.

So what were my small press…

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Goodbye Traditional, Hello Indie (Part I)

I think sharing experiences like this is important to many writers, not only to new, hopeful ones like me. Thank you very much, D. Wallace Peach for telling us your story.

Myths of the Mirror

en.wikimedia.org en.wikimedia.org

I’ve begun the process of reclaiming my 6 traditionally published books and republishing them myself. I thought it might be useful to document my reasons, particularly for those writers dawdling at this fork in the publishing road, trying to decide which way to go.

I published through a small press, and I don’t want to give the impression that this was a bad deal or that the publisher did anything wrong. It was, in fact, a valuable learning experience, especially for a new author and one as clueless as I. A small press may be the perfect publishing solution for many authors, especially if the words “traditionally published” carry personal weight.

Before I dig in, it’s important to state that – with a few exceptions – this was my experience. It reflects my personality, expectations, and quirks. What worked for me might not work for you and visa-versa. In…

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Why I’m Mad About Self-Publishing Stigma

Liz Long probably speaking for many Indie-authors. Read her article. She rocks!! Thank you, Liz!

I’m mad.

What’s worse is that what I’m mad about is truly something out of my control. There’s not a thing I can do about it except keep pushing barriers. To hold my head high and keep on keepin’ on with the rest of the crowd.

You can probably guess why I’m angry thanks to the headline. Wait – no, I’m NOT mad about self-publishing. But rather the thoughts behind self-publishing and the ideas that we’re not as good or “real” as traditionally published authors.

The publishing system isn’t broken by any means, but the stigma behind “traditional” and “indie” publishing has really gotten my goat lately.

I’m independently published, or self-published. What does that mean? It means I do not have an agent or traditional publisher backing me. It means that I’m in control of my stories, my edits, my covers, my marketing, and everything else that goes along…

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