Language Generator for Fantasy and Sci-Fi

Kristen Twardowski informs us with an exciting blog post about “Vulgar”, a language generator for Sci-Fi and Fantasy writers. Thanks so much Kristen.

Kristen Twardowski

I’ve talked about my fascination with language before, but sometimes writers need a little help creating words that make sense in their nascent worlds. I recently found something that streamlines that process.

Vulgar (pardon the terrible name) is a constructed language generator. The generator creates fully realized languages; if you were truly ambitious you could learn some of them. The program attempts to mimic real languages, so there are patterns to the words that develop. For instance, in 50% of generated languages, the word for “tongue” is the same as the word for “language”, and words often share roots as is the case for:

pson /pʂon/ n. paint; v. paint
psopru /ˈpʂopru/ n. painter

I’ve played around with the generator quite a bit and am highlighting a few sample languages below.

Vulgar Zulia.JPG via Vulgar

Vulgar Nahis.JPG via Vulgar

The above screenshots simply capture the summaries for the languages. The full pages, however…

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How to Embed Tweets in Your Blog Post

Sarah Brentyn of “Lemon Shark” provides us with great blogging tips. Thank you, Sarah!

Lemon Shark

lemon-shark-screen-shot-sarahb

Tweets aren’t just for Twitter anymore.

Here’s a neat thing you can do with those tweets right here on your WordPress blog. It’s wicked cool. And easy. 3 steps…done.

All of you lovely bloggers know I’m not a techie but I wanted to share this fun find with you.

I have visuals, too, which is awesome. Admittedly, I went a bit bonkers with the arrows but…you get the point. (I know. I’m hilarious.)

First we’re going old school with a “cut and paste” URL option, then we’ll embed an html code like we know what we’re doing.

No need to hurt your eyes squinting at the screenshots—you can click to enlarge them. Let’s get tweeting on our blogs.

Copy Link Option:

STEP ONE:

Choose the tweet you want. Click on the cute, little grey v-shaped thingy in the top, right corner.

Click to enlarge

STEP TWO:

You’ll see a drop-down…

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Not All Publishers are Equal

Steven Capps informs us with his article not all publishers are equal, which I think is an interesting and informative read, in particular for us ‘newbies’. Thanks Steven!

Steven Capps

I originally posted this in a Facebook group, but I liked the topic and wanted to expand on it here. If you’ve already seen it, I’m super sorry though like I said, I have added more content. Recently, I’ve had some writers asking whether a publisher is good or not. Ultimately, this decision is up to the writer looking to submit to them. We all have differing motivations and some simply just want to get published and nothing more while others want to make a career out of writing. This post is not going to talk about scam publishers (you can read my post about them here), but rather what seperates an okay publisher from a good publisher.

There are three requirements I look for when I am considering if a market is worthy of a submission. If they do not meet these then they are a waste of…

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Productivity Tips: How to Stay Focused Admist Chaos

I got an interesting email today. Karina from BookMeditationRetreats.com has informed me about an article, Lystia Putranto published February 3, 2017.

Karina wrote:

“To be productive is a something that we all struggle with sometimes and at times, we find ourselves procrastinating on our daily task. On this article, our contributing writer, Lystia, shares a list of practical tips that can help us establish and maintain our focus.”

I found this article helpful and interesting and agree with Karina, that we might find this post very useful.

The title is: Productivity Tips: How to Stay Focused Admist Chaos and Lystia lists five very useful tips on how to organize ourselves.

  1. Make a Daily Schedule and Stick to It
  2. Take Up Meditation
  3. Do One Thing at a Time
  4. Minimize Distractions
  5. Give Yourself Designated Breaks

Each of the points includes more detailed explanations and gives us insight in her studies.

All in all a very interesting and useful blog post.

Please read the entire article here: https://www.bookmeditationretreats.com/news/productivity-tips-stay-focused

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Tricky choices for authors

Helen Carey published a list on the choices we authors need decide on when writing a novel. What a great post!

helencareybooks

otterThere are so many choices for an author to make when embarking on a novel. What time period? What setting? What structure? What genre? What characters? What events? How true should it be to real history? What is the time frame? What is it all really about?

Many of these need to be answered before even starting out. No wonder so many potential novelists are put off at the first hurdle.

And as soon as you’ve made those decisions, (assuming you haven’t given up in despair,) another wave of questions immediately comes hurtling towards you.

How are you going to tell the story? Whose point of view? First or third person? What tone? What voice? Where should it start? What is going to kick the whole thing off? Where is it going to end? How are you going to layer in the clues to make that ending satisfactory? And, horror of horrors…

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The Single Largest Problem of Most First Time Novels

Kirsten Lamb provides us “firsties’ with a guide to write a good first time novel. Thank you very much Kristen. You’re an angel!

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Original image courtesy of flowcomm, via Flickr Commons Original image courtesy of flowcomm, via Flickr Commons

All righty. So we have spent a couple of posts talking about getting our head right when it comes to doing this writing thing. Once we get our heads in the game, then the practical How To advice gets a heck of a lot more mileage. Today we are going to talk about the writing of the actual novel.

When I started out wanting to become a writer years ago, I was so clueless I didn’t even realize I was clueless. I had an overinflated ego from all those years making As in high school then college English. I believed I could write so when it came to reading craft books? I thumbed through them and decided I didn’t want my writing to be “formulaic” *flips hair*.

Trying to take a short cut cost me a lot of time and wasted words…

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The Trouble with Series – Guest Post…

Jemima Pett, guest blogger on The Story Reading Ape’s blog published an article about the “trouble with series” which I think, provides us with helpful information on what to consider when writing a series. Thank you, Jemima!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

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One of the best things to do as an indie author is to write a series. People like reading them, and it makes your author page look much better when you have more than one title to your name.

For most of us, writing our first book is a Big Thing. Finishing it, whether after six months or six years, does not immediately change your mindset into ‘published author’. It’s often only much later that you read the advice about series and start to think of the sequel.

Even the most successful authors fall foul of this. I was at a Crime Writing event last year (Noirwich), where the well-loved British writer Elly Griffiths confessed that she had never expected her first book, The Crossing Places, to lead to the long run that is the Ruth Galloway series. If she had, she wouldn’t have packed so much into…

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