Too late for this year but perhaps next…? A competition for self-published authors – Written By Bridget Whelan

Bridget Wheelan informs us about a competition for self-published authors. Unfortunately for this year it’s already too late, but maybe next? Thank you, Bridget!

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August 31st is the deadline for the Kindle Storyteller Award which Amazon celebrates the best self-published story in the UK with a £20,000 cash prize.

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

 

I know that is still a month away, but you have to do an awful lot of work to make sure your story qualifies and readers are a crucial part in helping to choose the shortlist. Customer feedback is based on such factors as quality of reviews, sales and pages read in Kindle Unlimited. I underlined the word quality because Amazon seem to be flagging up that 50 ‘It’s really great‘ reviews won’t cut it. What you really need is quality AND quantity.

To qualify you need to publish on KDP, Amazon’s publishing arm in both eBook and paperback versions. The paperback version of your book must be at least 24 pages long and the qualifying period for…

CONTINUE READING HERE

How to show the emotions of non-viewpoint characters – Written By Louise Harnby

Louise Harnby published a fascinating article about the emotions of non-viewpoint characters and how to show them without screwing up. Thank you, Louise!

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Non-viewpoint characters have emotions too.

But how do we show them without head-hopping?

The answer lies in mastering observable behaviour.

Continue reading HERE

 

4 New Agents Seeking Romance, Fantasy, YA, Literary Fiction, Nonfiction, Memoir and more – Written By Erica Verrillo

Thank you very much for this information about agents looking for books, Erica Verrillo. We really appreciate your help!


on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

Here are four new literary agents actively seeking clients.

Mariah Nichols is interested in adult and young adult fiction with genres including thriller, upmarket, romance/rom-com, horror, family drama, science fiction/paranormal, and women’s fiction. She is also wanting to represent nonfiction in categories such as cookbooks, memoirs, self-help, lifestyle, and how-to. Stories that showcase diversity and highlight mental health or special needs is something that she would especially like to see.

Amy Giuffrida wants middle grade and YA horror, romance, fantasy and mystery as well as adult Horror, Romance/Chic Lit/Rom Com and nonfiction.

Shanna Furey is looking for Historical Fiction and Non-Fiction, Mystery, Fantasy, Young Adult, Comedic, or General Fiction. Devon Halliday is interested in literary and upmarket fiction with sharp, insightful writing and vivid characters. She’s partial to speculative fiction, women’s fiction, contemporary fiction, metafiction, light psychological suspense, and romcoms. She leans toward adult fiction, but will also consider YA and cross-over projects.

On the nonfiction side Devon is on the lookout for creative and narrative nonfiction, investigative journalism, broad-perspective memoir, and popular science, psychology, medicine, and philosophy.

Always check the agency website and agent bio before submitting. Agents can switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements can change.

Get Full Details HERE

 

The Evolution of Blogging – Written By Nicholas Rossis

Nicholas C. Rossis informs us in his latest blog post about the evolution of blogging and what and how it had developed since he joined the great group of bloggers, a long, long time ago! Thanks so much for sharing your experience with us, Nicholas!


I have been online since 1985. I was one of the first members of the BBS (Bulletin Board) scene in Greece back when we connected to a server using landline modems. I still remember my thrill when I finally got my hands on a 9600 bps modem and could download pictures as well as texts.

In 1995, I developed my first website. Even then, I had identified a need for regularly updated content. While some pages were meant to be static, there were news and events to share. Web developers usually met this need by introducing a News page and placing there any related items. As the new millennium approached, we started placing some of these on the home page, too.

Out of these News pages came blogging. Nowadays, 25 years after I developed my first website, most of my living comes through freelance writing for company blogs.

CONTINUE READING HERE

 

Quiet: Have We Forgotten to Be Still in a World That Never Stops? – Written By Kristen Lamb

Today I discovered that article on Kristen Lamb’s blog, a post I can fully relate to. She speaks from my heart! Thank you for that post, Kristen!


quiet, busy, productivity, business culture, Kristen Lamb, benefits of rest, rest and creativity, burnout, stress

Quiet. It’s a rather strange experience if one has grown too accustomed to the go-go-go pace of the modern world.

Recently—well, not too recently—my grandfather died. I was raised by my grandparents, so when a week and a half before Christmas he suddenly passed away? It was a blow.

Sure, he was 93. But, he was feisty like me and was far from the typical elderly person. He’d golfed (and played the entire course) until he was 90 and even a bit past that. He played cards and continued to battle crabgrass in triple-digit Texas summer heat armed with only a hand-sharpened garden hoe.

I kid you not, I went to visit one day and my sweat-soaked grandfather was digging up holly shrubs in 102 degree heat. He was almost 90 at the time. I suppose part of me expected he’d live forever. I’d at least expected to have him until 100.

Anyway, I caught a cold this past October, which, because I refused to slow down ‘enough’—which ‘slow down enough’ might as well be a friggin’ Leprechaun for me since I’ve yet to spot it—the cold turned into bronchitis in November.

This already had me down.

Continue Reading Here

How to DIY PR for Indie Authors – Written By Helen Baggott

On ‘The Story Reading Ape’s’ blog I found the link to a fascinating and very educational article concerning self-publishing and PR for self-published writers. Thank you so much Helen Baggott!


on Self Publishing Advice:

PR can feel like a mystery to writers. It’s done by experts and those in the field or the industry. But author member, Helen Baggott is here to remove the mystery and tell us how we can DIY PR as indie authors.

When I talk to other authors about their marketing strategy, how they plan to recoup their costs, I tell them, ‘No one will knock on your door and ask if you’ve written a book’. Authors have to reach out to readers.

Continue reading HERE

50 Science Fiction Plot Ideas and Writing Prompts – Written By Bryn Donovan

Bryn Donovan provides us with 50 Science Fiction plot ideas and writing prompts. We never know when they come in handy, right? Thank you very much for your support, Bryn Donovan.


One of my most popular blog posts is my 50 Fantasy Plot Ideas and Writing Prompts, so I thought I’d share a companion post for writers of scifi and futuristic short stories and novels.

Some of these may be more along the lines of “speculative fiction” than science fiction. They include prompts about the environment, artificial intelligence, genetics, medicine, time travel, space exploration, alien races, and alternative histories. The real value of any science fiction premise or concept, of course, is the way the author uses it to explore questions about society, humanity, and relationships.

If you’re interested in publishing science fiction and you don’t have an agent, you might want to take a look at my roundup of fantasy and science fiction publishers who accept unsolicited (or unagented) manuscripts.

If you’re not writing scifi right now, but you might be in the future, you might want to pin or bookmark the post for future reference!

1. All citizens are temporarily neutered at birth. Would-be parents must prove to the government that they’ll be suitable caretakers and providers before they are allowed to procreate.

2. All marriages must be approved by a department of the government, which analyzes massive amounts of data to predict the success of the union, its economic and social impact on society, the health and welfare of any children, and so on. It’s such a hassle that many people opt for government-arranged marriages instead.

3. Global warming prompts rapid mutations in the human species.

 

To read all 50 ideas and prompts, go to:

http://www.bryndonovan.com/2018/05/31/50-science-fiction-plot-ideas-and-writing-prompts/

 

 

DSM Publications – With Don Massenzio


Welcome back, Don Massenzio! It’s good to have you here again. Let’s talk about your new business and how it is part of the writing world.

 

 

 

 


1. With your blog you are helping so many aspiring authors. What made you decide to do more than that?

There were a few factors. I wanted to be sure that I enjoyed editing and formatting the work of author authors. I’ve worked with a few authors and find that I still enjoy helping them bring their work to life. Another factor was the stigma (perceived or actual) that independently published authors face. Traditional publishing purists will tell you that our work is substandard due to the lack of professionalism and quality. I wanted to help the independent author community, as a whole, improve the quality of their work with professional editing and formatting at a price that won’t break the bank. If we can bring each other up, it will improve the entire community. Finally, I have always thought about launching this type of business as a retirement thing, but I lost my day job a few months ago and I accelerated the launch as a way to bring in some income.

2. Did you always plan on offering author services or did this idea just occur?

My author blog started about three years ago. I was very prolific with posts designed to help indie authors improve their quality. After a year or so of doing this, I collected them all into a book. (You can now get that book for free if you sign up for my newsletter). These author services are a way to help authors with the things they typically shouldn’t do for themselves.

3. Does your service include more than just editing?

Beyond proofreading and line editing, I offer developmental editing which encompasses looking for things like redundancies, continuity errors and other elements of writing that are apart from just making sure spelling, punctuation and grammar are correct. Additionally, I offer supplemental and complete ghost writing for writers that have an idea or an outline that they just can’t complete as a finished work. I’ve done some ghost writing in the past and it is gratifying to help someone realize their vision. I also offer formatting services for both print and eBook. The two formats are very different and it’s important to devote some time to formatting so that a book can look as professional and polished as possible.

4. How do you work cooperatively with authors?

Once I begin the editing process, I like to work closely with the author. I will edit their manuscript using Microsoft Word in twenty-page increments. This way, I can give and get feedback during the process and not wait until an entire book has been edited to uncover a problem. For instance, one book that I’ve edited recently involved characters that were from another time. It took a bit of back and forth with the author to land on exactly how old-fashioned spelling and phrases would be handled in a way that wouldn’t confuse or put off readers. Once we established the ground rules, it went very smoothly.

5. How does your editing process work exactly?

As I mentioned, I start by editing the manuscript in 20-page increments. Within the manuscript I use the ‘track changes’ feature in word and suggest edits, word substitutions and other modifications based on the level of editing desired. I then supply a ‘marked up’ copy showing every change and comment and a ‘clean’ copy with all the edits applied. The author can then make the choice of assessing each edit suggestion individually, but they can also read the manuscript from the clean copy with all the edits applied.
Once the manuscript is completely edited and the changes have been approved by the author, I will format the manuscript for print and/or eBook if that is desired. I provide discounts to authors that wish to have both editing and formatting services.

6. Who can contact you for your services?

While I am targeting my services for independent authors, any author that needs these services is welcome to reach out to me.

7. Do you have a website for your services?

I do. You can find it at https://dsm-publications.com/

 

8. Is there anything else you want to tell us about your work?

The indie author community is full of wonderful writers with great stories to tell. My goal is to help those storytellers produce work with the best possible quality so that they can have their work stand toe-to-toe with traditionally published authors.

Thank you so much for this interview! Please come back any time!

7 Tips to Help Promote Your First Self-Published Book – by Gloria Kopp…

On The Story Reading Ape’s blog I found an interesting and very useful guest post, written by Gloria Kopp. She gives us 7 helpful tips to promote our self published book. Thank you, Gloria!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Sitting down and writing a novel is a huge achievement and one you should be proud of. The same goes for a non-fiction book – producing work like that takes a lot of time and effort, and it’s something that not many people pull off in their lifetime. However, once your book is written, you have the added pressure of needing to sell it. A lot of writers make the mistake of thinking that dumping their book online is all they need to do to sell their novel, however if you want any sort of commercial success, you’ll need to promote your work. Fortunately, self-promotion is simple when you follow the 7 tips below.

  1. Have a ‘.com’ Domain

If you want to be seen as a professional writer and author then you’ll need a fully-fledged website. People rarely want to spend their money on amateur work as there’s a risk…

View original post 464 more words

Why you should have a professional author photo #WriterWednesday #AuthorMarketing #AmWriting

Author D. E. Haggerty informs us why it’s important to have a professional author photo. Thank you for this blog post.

D.E. Haggerty

I’ll be brutally honest – I didn’t think much of the whole author photo thing when I started developing my author platform. And, yes, I still hate those words ‘author platform’ now as much as I did in 2013 when I published my first book and started researching all this author marketing stuff. Like most self-published authors, I used a favorite personal photo for my author profile. In my case, it was a picture taken during my 12 ½ year anniversary party (12 ½ year anniversary is totally a thing). When I started using that picture, it was already a few years old. At some point, I had to admit that it didn’t really look like me anymore. At that point, I grabbed a vacation photo and used that. But then that photo started looking a bit dated as well. I’d be damned if I yet again updated my author…

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