10 Different Writer Reactions To The Question – ‘How is Your Book Coming Along?’ #MondayBlogs – Written By Lucy Mitchell

Lucy Mitchell provides us with a fantastic blog post about the question “How is your book coming along?” and the different answers. Please, go to her original post and publish your comments there! Thank you, Lucy!


 

I love this question – how’s your book coming along?

My reaction to this simple question can change daily, sometimes hourly.

Here are 10 different writer reactions to that question.

They are a mixture of some of the reactions I have overheard during my time as a writer and my own. I will let you work out which are mine 🤣

1. ‘Great thanks!’ Beaming smile and twinkling eyes. All is well in Writing Land.

2. Awkward silence on the writer’s part. There are no words to describe how that book is coming along.

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Why I Stopped Questioning My Own Writing Process #writer – Written By Lucy Mitchell

Thanks for a great article about other writer’s writing process vs. our own. I think I still need to learn how to do what you did already.


I love experiencing what I call a writing epiphany. They’re not regular occurrences and I think this is what makes them so wonderful. Mine always seem to occur while I am in my little car on my way to work at around seven in the morning. This is the time of the day when my brain will be chewing over an aspect of my WIP or a writing issue and then it will make a shocking revelation. I will then whisper, ‘OMG’, squeal with delight as everything has suddenly made sense, babble about the epiphany to myself for a mile or so and then turn up my 80’s hits for a celebratory sing-song. My day at work will then be a breeze. As I said above these are NOT regular occurrences.

Well, I had one of these moments a few weeks ago. I realized it was time to stop…

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Introducing A Great Place To Write II

It’s been quite some time since I wrote about a great place to write. But a few weeks ago I found one. It was quite unexpected.

It’s getting cooler here… yes, even in Southern California autumn is visible and feelable. A couple weeks ago, I knew I’m going to be cool sitting outside and writing, and there was a breeze that can make writing on paper a bit uncomfortable at times. Besides, I hadn’t eaten that day and was a bit hungry.

I discovered ‘Mimi’s Bistro & Bakery’ in Thousand Oaks and found it inviting on the outside. I decided to go in and see if I could stay for a while, eat, and write.

It was homey and cozy inside as well, and I had a wonderful waitress, called Melissa. They have a quite attractive menu here:

I told Melissa who I am and what I planned, and she beamed like the sunshine and invited me to stay as long as I liked. She paid really good attention to me, did not constantly disturb me, and counted on me looking at her if I needed something.

I was in Mimi’s Bistro for about three and a half hours and loved it! The food is great, the staff was wonderful and polite, and since then, I had been back at ‘Mimi’s’ and enjoyed the ambiance and Melissa’s service again. Drop by and enjoy it!

That particular location of Mimi’s Bistro and Bakery can be found here:

Thousand Oaks
400 N Moorpark Rd.
Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
Phone: (805) 373-6161

If you ever go there, to eat – or write – or both, and you see Melissa, please tell her I said hi. She’s amazing!

How To Survive Deleting Characters #AmWriting #WritingCommunity – Written By Lucy Mitchell

Thanks so much for this very educational and supportive article on your blog Blonde Write More, on how to survive deleting characters. So far I haven’t had to do that yet – but I admit, I had to kill one of mine which nearly broke my heart.


Writing the death of a much-loved character can be demanding and can leave you emotionally wiped out.

Did you know that there is another literary situation which can be just as challenging and one which can cast a nasty gloom over your writing life – deleting a character from your story.

I am not talking about deleting a random minor character; a fictional person who you created one day after too much coffee and inserted into the middle of your novel, just to beef it out (technical literary term) and then deleted them the following day after realising your stupidity. *Sigh*

No. I am talking about those major changes to a draft which result in you deciding to get rid of a key character.

I guarantee this fictional person will have been with you since the start of your story and someone who you have history with. You and this character will have been through some stuff; your rocky first draft, that dreadful second draft which no one liked, your third draft where you felt all hope was lost and the fourth draft which resulted in you wondering why the hell you had ever taken up writing.

You and this character will have shared story in-jokes. They will have been there for you during the bad times. You know them inside out and they are like a good friend.

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How To Survive Being Married To A Writer #WritingCommunity – Written By Lucy Mitchell

Lucy Mitchell published a very helpful post on her ‘Blonde Write More’ blog. The post is mainly helpful to a writer’s better half and I think she gets a few points that not only made me smile but nodding enthusiastically. See for yourself. Thanks so much, Lucy!


It’s not easy being married to a writer. We are strange creatures.

Here are some useful tips on how to survive being married to a writer:

1. Accept the fact that you will spend a lot of your marriage talking about people, events and locations that don’t actually exist.

2. When your writer wakes you in the small hours with an amazing new idea for their next story you need to wake up, switch on the light and let them talk it through. Moaning about what time it is, how tired you are and what you have on at work is not going to help your writer. This is a big moment for them, it’s the birth of something wonderful. Your support is needed 24-7.

3. Marital relations and their writing ‘ups and downs’ will become interlinked. When their writing is going well you can expect good times, kisses and smiles. When their writing is not going so well you can expect tension, tears and tantrums.

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How To Spend Your Vacation Writing

I generally do whatever I can to use my free time to write. The very best time is my vacation. Tons of free time and “nothing” else to do. Yes, of course, there’s the usually shopping trip. Meeting friends, book fairs, a few meetings, a little bit of sightseeing, if necessary, but normally I spend my vacation time with my Californian Mom, my sister… you get the point. Places where I can relax and concentrate on my books and stories.

Once again I was lucky enough to have had a home for three weeks, where I had nearly nothing to do than to shop, type, and write.

I could concentrate on the current book – number seven in the series, where I got stuck while being at home. No matter what I tried, I just couldn’t get forward with the story. I had an idea and it didn’t work. I wanted to write about a conversation between two characters and it didn’t make sense, not even to me.

As soon as I was gone, decently relaxed and had peace and silence around me (two dogs, four cats, a handful of birds and a guinea pig, my pen touched the paper and wrote.

I mentioned this before, and it once again proved right with me: I cannot write a good story (or part of it) when I’m stressed out or unhappy. Hemingway wrote his best books when he was weeping over his life and/or drunk. Not working with me.

I’m very happy my work made this good progress during this vacation, even more since the first book of the series got its copyright and is currently prepared to be published.

I’m so very excited!

Thank you all who have worked on this with me.

This vacation was successful for me, even though I was “just hanging out”! It’s been calm, quiet, helpful, reducing stress and homey too!

Thanks to my sister and my brother-in-law who hosted me during all this time!! You rock!!