5 Ways To Avoid Info-Dumping – Written By K. M. Allan

K. M. Allan writes a phenomenal post about authors and info-dumping. Read about it on her blog. Thanks a lot for your advice, K. M. Allan.


When you become a writer, one of the “rules” you’re advised to learn is to avoid info-dumping.

If you haven’t heard of it before, it’s when the writer bombards the reader with everything they think they should know—all at once.

While you might think there’s no way you do that, info-dumping is an easy trap to fall into. It’s one of those writer-blind spots where we can easily see it in other’s work, but don’t notice it in our own.

It can worm its way in like typo gremlins, but here are some likely places you’ll find info-dumping so you can work out ways to avoid it.

5 Ways To Avoid Info-Dumping

Check The Starts

Info-dumping likes to live at the start of things, such as the first chapter, the first introduction of a character, or the first instance of world-building. It sets up home there because the writer makes it the perfect place to build.

Think about what happens when you’re penning the first draft. You’re discovering the story, telling it to yourself, and getting it all on the page. Once it’s there, we forget to examine it in later drafts for info-dumping.

As an example, let’s say it’s the first time your MC has visited the place your story is set. Trying to work out where you’re going with it, your writer-brain brought in another character with a lengthy explanation of the town’s history and why no one goes near the creepy abandoned two-story house on Cliché Crescent.

You needed to know those things to move onto your next chapter, but it’s likely the reader doesn’t need to know it all on their first read.

CONTINUE READING HERE

 

Featured Author – Interview – The Return Of Allan Hudson

It is a very special pleasure for me to welcome you back on ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest’. In your former visits we learned about your writing, your writing process and asked for some advice. But there are so many more questions to ask! 

Let’s see what you can tell us today: 

  1. Are you still writing in the same genre as you did before, and if not, why did you switch – or would you ever think to change genres?

 I started writing action/adventure stories because they appeal to me as a reader but my most recent release was a historical fiction set in 1911 in Scotland. It follows the life of a young man forced to leave his home to live with a bachelor uncle. I also have a collection of short stories that include a variety of genres.

I enjoy historical fiction and am continuing with the series and am working on Vol, 2. But sticking with my original action/adventure genre, I also have a new Jo Naylor adventure series and book 2 is being launched mid-February. Book three of my Drake Alexander series will be published in the fall.

 

2. Please, tell us a little about your writing process.

I have a special spot in my converted garage. Formerly a workshop, I redesigned a specific area for my laptop and notes. I write almost every morning now that I am retired. I start early and write while it is quiet. I prefer silence when I write and I find I get distracted with music or other noises. I do my research as needed and have a trusty note pad as my side to keep track of my characters and events.

  

3. What is important to know for young, new authors and writers?

 The one thing I might suggest, besides what every writer will tell you – to just write, is to decide before hand how you’re going to publish your story. It can be confusing to a new writer with so many options and everyone new to the industry needs to be warned of the con artists promising to publish your book when you pay them a lot of money. Talk to your author friends and get advice before you start looking for publishers. Get professional help – editors, beta readers and cover designers if you are considering self-publishing.

  

4. Your experience in the writing world, do you think it has already taken you where you wanted to go?

 I like this question. My writing has taken me beyond any expectations I might’ve had when I started writing. I write as a hobby and it has been tremendously rewarding to see a following grow, people wanting to purchase and read my stories. Leaving uplifting reviews. To hear someone tell you how much they enjoyed your work is the greatest reward. I’m so appreciative of their support.

 

  1. Are any of your books part of a series?

Yes. I enjoy a series and have three on the go. The first is my Drake Alexander Adventures of which there are two books now and the third is in editing, due in the fall. I hope to continue this series as long as I have ideas and oddly enough, I have the last of the series already planned but not sure how many will appear before then.

My latest series is the Shattered series, Jo Naylor adventures. Book two – Shattered Lives – is out last week and number three is in development at present. The publication is targeted for January 2022. This is a planned series of five novellas. I decided on novellas because I wanted the action fast-paced and short fiction. It has been well received and I’m pleased with the outcome so far.

Prior to the release of Book two of the Naylor groups, I published a historical novel in 2020 – The Alexanders – which will also be part of a series. Volume 2 is also in the works. Hoping for publication in the summer or fall of 2022.

  

6. Please, tell us about your projects again. Was there progress since the last interview or are there even completely new projects?

There has been a lot of progress with my writing since my last visit to the Treasure Chest. In addition to my historical fiction – The Alexanders – as I mentioned above, I’ve since written the Jo Naylor series which I am excited about. It will be a series of five action packed novellas. The Shattered series. Book two, Shattered Lives is coming this month. I don’t have enough time to write all the stories in my head, but I’m working on it.

 

Thank you for being my guest. It was such a pleasure to have you here!!

 It is my absolute pleasure to be your guest, Aurora. I appreciate the opportunity to be here. Thank you.


Allan’s new book:

Jo Naylor is on the run. Wanted back in Canada for questioning regarding her father’s suicide. She has no intention of returning. With a new identity, she takes up temporary residence in a foreign country.

She may not be a detective any longer but once a cop, always a cop. A distraught woman pleads with Naylor to find her daughter. Should she help? She doesn’t know anyone in Thailand, doesn’t know the geography but that doesn’t stop Naylor from sticking her nose where it shouldn’t be.

Naylor and her new sidekick, an orphaned girl, join up with a local PI. There’s more than a missing child at stake.

Get the book here

Shattered Lives: A Jo Naylor Adventure – Kindle edition by Hudson, Allan. Literature & Fiction Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.


Connect with Allan:

www.southbranchscribbler.ca

https://www.facebook.com/southbranchscribbler/

 https://twitter.com/hudson_allan

 https://plus.google.com/u/0/+allanhudson1953

 https://www.wattpad.com/user/allanhudson

Inspiration – Fellow Writers, Where Do You Find Yours? – Written By Don Massenzio

On Don Massenzio’s blog, I found an extended and very interesting post about inspiration. I’m generally fascinated to hear where experienced writers like Don Massenzio, author of the Frank Rozzani-series, got their inspiration from. In this article, Don informs us about different ways inspiration came to him. Thank you very much, Don!


It is a great day to start something big – motivational handwriting on a napkin with a cup of coffee

 

2020 – The Year Without Writing Inspiration

2021 is a year full of possibilities. I keep telling myself this over and over.

The pandemic caused me to pause my creative writing for a number of months. The reasons for the lull in my literary creativity are many, but I’d like to believe that most of them are under control or behind me at this point.

As I look for inspiration to jumpstart my writing and to ignite the fire to finish my next book, I decided to go back to those things that inspired me in the past.

I thought I would share these inspirational elements with you to help you find inspiration and invite you to share those things that inspire you to write when you have a lull in your creativity.

Here are the things that have worked for me:

CONTINUE READING HERE

Writing Is Magic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


When I was looking for inspirational quotes for writers,  I did not start searching for ‘Stephen King’ quotes in the first place. Of course, he is an amazing writer. I love some of his books. Later on in my life, I quit reading horror books. I loved each book of him that I read. But I admit, looking for a calm, inspirational ‘soft’ quote, and finding one that is almost ‘romantic’ from Stephen King, made me realize I ‘horribly’ underestimated him, pun intended.

And here it was, ‘speaking’ to me! You can, You should, and if You’re brave enough to start, You will. Writing is Magic.

I know I’m a wimp, but these three words almost made me cry. Yes, writing is magic! Or at least it is for me! I’m not necessarily talking about the fact that I write fantasy. I’m talking about the process of writing. When I take my pen and set it on the paper to watch the words flowing out of it, watch the ink forming the words that become a story, then I feel like I’m in a magical land, where I can hide. And yes, there is a lot to hide from. The current times, the situation, certain problems… whatever is happening… when I write, it is forgotten, for a certain time. When I write, I drink the water of life, as King describes it… and I’m happy.

Writing is art, writing is creative, writing is a place I can go where the magic happens. And the result is characters, places, stories, and books. That’s the place I want to be.

Thank you, Stephen King, for this wonderful emotional inspiration!


 

I don’t think Stephen King needs much of an introduction on a writer’s blog. He is, who he is, an inspiration to many of us! I, therefore, just picked a short description of who he is. Please click the ‘source’ link below if you would like to read more about him.

Picture courtesy of Google.com

Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of horrorsupernatural fiction, suspense, crime, science-fiction, and fantasy novels. His books have sold more than 350 million copies,[2] and many have been adapted into films, television series, miniseries, and comic books. King has published 61 novels, including seven under the pen name Richard Bachman, and five non-fiction books.[3] He has also written approximately 200 short stories, most of which have been published in book collections.[4][5]

King has received Bram Stoker AwardsWorld Fantasy Awards, and British Fantasy Society Awards. In 2003, the National Book Foundation awarded him the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.[6] He has also received awards for his contribution to literature for his entire bibliography, such as the 2004 World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement and the 2007 Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America.[7] In 2015, he was awarded with a National Medal of Arts from the U.S. National Endowment for the Arts for his contributions to literature.[8] He has been described as the “King of Horror”, a play on his surname and a reference to his high standing in pop culture.[9]

(Source: Stephen King – Wikipedia)

Using a Character Bible – Is it worth it? – Written By Don Massenzio

Don Massenzio, the author of the Frank Rozzani-series, has published a fascinating post about using a character bible. I’m always enthusiastic when I can share an article that shows us an experienced author’s recommendation. Thank you for sharing yours, Don!


As I embark on my next writing venture after a 2020 hiatus, I realized something. The equation of my age plus the stress of 2020 and the length of time since I’ve written a Frank Rozzani book has added up to me forgetting the details of many of my familiar characters. I remember reading a while back about having a character bible, a book of character profiles. The article I read talked about how this is especially important if you write a multiple-book series with the same characters.

At the time, I said to myself, “I’ll never forget these characters. They’re part of me.” Well, as I get older, I’m pretty sure there are actual parts of me that I’ve forgotten.

As I try to write for my tried and true characters, I find myself searching my previous books for things like dates, names, hair and eye color and other things that would be great to have at my fingertips. As a result, I’m revisiting the idea of the character bible. I thought that one useful resource would be to go to the blogging community of authors, editors and readers and ask for your opinions and experience.

I thought I would begin, however, by telling you what I’ve learned about this tool for those of you that haven’t heard of it or have been using elements of it without realizing it had a name.

What is a Character Bible?

There is no single definition or series of components that make up a character bible. From the research I’ve done, it’s basically a collection of character profiles each of which tell you about the character’s:

  • Name – This might seem obvious, but a character’s name is important. Think of Alex Cross and the numerous James Patterson books bearing his surname in the title. To a much, much lesser degree, of course, there are my Frank Rozzani detective novels that all have ‘Frank’ in some form in the title Frankly Speaking, Let Me Be Frank, Frank Incensed (my personal favorite), Frankly My Dear and Frank Immersed.
  • Physical Appearance/Mannerisms – The characters height, body type, hair color, eye color, physical anomalies and disabilities and other information about how the character looks.
  • History – Information about the character’s backstory, cultural, educational and socio-economic situation and any other relevant information that is material to the plot.
  • Personality – What psychological quirks, conditions or flaws does the character have? What motivates him/her? What are his/her desires? What’s missing from his/her life?

Now, the worst thing you can do is dump all of this information about the character into your story in one fell swoop. You can dribble out the information as needed in small doses. The other thing to avoid, however, is your character developing some ability or piece of knowledge from his background out of convenience to get you past a snag in the story without foreshadowing it first.

CONTINUE READING HERE

How I Stay Organized While Writing a Story – Written By Sharon K Connell

Whether you’re a traditionally published or an Indie author/writer, whether you are the type who outlines your entire book or write by the seat of your pants, or even if you’re somewhere in between, a writer needs to be organized. That organization may look like utter chaos to others, or your writing space may lean toward the OCD type personality. It does matter, as long as it works for you and helps you accomplish your goals in writing.

Throughout the writing of my now seven books, my writing space has always leaned more toward the chaotic look to others. But I do know where everything on my desk is at the moment it’s needed. Well, maybe not every time, but it doesn’t take me long to find something.

From the beginning of my writing career, I’ve been an Indie Author, and I write by the seat of my pants. No outline beforehand is needed. When I first start to write a story, I start with a 5 subject spiral notebook or a 3-ring binder. Each section is labeled for quick access.

 

The first section is designated for my characters profile. Each character, starting with my main character and then as they show up in the story, has their own page, which is numbered. On that page, I write down everything I know about the character, starting with their appearance. As the story progresses, each time I give a specific attribute to or detail about the character, I list it on the page.

At the top of the page, under the character’s full name, is noted hair color and texture, eyes, height, physique, etc. Later I might add the kind of car they drive, where they work, and even how they drink their coffee. In this way, if it comes up again, the character doesn’t change their appearance or habits. A list of the characters and the page where their information is found is on the front divider for that section.

The next section has what I call a “Running Outline” of the story.

In other words, I mark the chapter and scene in the margin and give a brief explanation of what’s happening in that scene. The day and time, if changed from the previous scene, is also noted.

While I’m creating the running outline, I jot down all special events on a calendar. For instance, if my character is celebrating Thanksgiving dinner in 2020 with a friend out of town, and a fire breaks out which is pertinent to the story, I notate it on the calendar. If an important character shows up for dinner the next day, I notate it on the calendar. In this way, I can see at a glance how many days have elapsed from that event to the next without having to reread all my notes.

It helps to keep your timeline straight.

Major ideas are jotted down in the last section. That also becomes my catchall for all ideas, changes, things I need to check, etc.

The other two sections are used for research notes and misc. like things to check before sending the ms to the editor.

At the end of the spiral, I work backward on the pages to make notes for a book launch, book trailer, etc. Extra tabs come in handy here.

From the picture of my desk above, you can see that I have many notes hanging on my desk. These are information notes I refer to all the time while writing, so I don’t have to keep looking things up in my many resource books.

Being an Indie Author, I don’t have to keep to a strict schedule like writing so many words per day. But I do keep myself on a loose schedule. I know I want to have a new book published during the summer, and something smaller (novella, short story collection, etc.) at the end of the year. But I don’t stress over it. Since I’ve fallen into a pattern of doing the stories this way for the past two years, it now comes naturally.

I hope I’ve given you an idea of how to organize your writing system. Most of you seasoned writers probably already have your own organizational method, but maybe this will help one or two of the newbies on the block. J

Best wishes on your writing journey.

 

Here are the links to my books in order of publication.

A Very Present Help http://amzn.to/2yuF4eE 

Paths of Righteousness http://www.amazon.com/dp/1732923701 

There Abideth Hope http://www.amazon.com/dp/173292371X 

His Perfect Love http://amzn.to/2iCMALI 

Icicles to Moonbeams (Novella) https://amzn.to/2OfcHYi

Treasure in a Field www.amazon.com/dp/1732923736

Sharon’s Shorts~A Multi-Genre Collection of Short Stories https://www.amazon.com/dp/1732923744

Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/author/sharonkconnell

 

Here’s a comment or two about my writing to tempt you. J

“The author writes with a uniquely vivid and dramatic touch that keeps the reader engrossed in the narrative throughout. Her characters are strongly drawn, distinctly memorable, and wholly realistic. Her plot-lines are, in this writer’s experience, top-drawer in their nail-biting intensity.” From Author, Alan O’Reilly

“Connell knows exactly how to prime the reader for a knockout climax. She litters her scenes with genius, loaded details to heighten the tension. She increases the stakes with every page. Behind the humor and romance, she builds the danger until any little sound — elevator doors that open in the story and the phone that rings next to you on the side table — sends your heartbeat into a cardio workout.

“The edge of your seat may be frayed, but when your doctor remarks that your heart is healthy and robust, you’ll thank the suspense-induced cardio workout Connell gave.”~Andra Loy, ACFW Scribes member

Please take time to visit me on my website: www.authorsharonkconnell.com I’d love to hear from you.

 

Have Fun Writing for Children – Guest Post By Darlene Foster

If you like children and are quite childish, something I´ve often been accused of, then writing for children may seem easy and natural.

I began my love affair with words many years ago. Some of my fondest memories are being read to as a child, visiting the library, and discovering the ability to read by myself. I still have worn copies of favourite childhood books, such as The Bobbsey Twins, Little Women, Black Beauty and Anne of Green Gables; and revisit these old friends from time to time. Books and children go together like toast and jam. Recently, one seven-year-old friend said to me, “Who doesn´t like books?” I never show up without books as gifts for my grandchildren. I am known as The Book Grandma.

It´s not surprising that I love writing stories for children.

While writing for children can be fun, it isn´t easy. It requires removing yourself from the adult world and thinking like a twenty-first-century kid (unless you’re writing a historical novel, then a kid from whatever century you are writing about). Fortunately, I like to hang out with kids, listen to the words they use, observe the gestures, the looks, the trends. I also enjoy reading children’s books to see what sparks the interest of today’s young people. Children notice things adults don’t and could care less about things adults think are important. It’s necessary to get into their headspace. And guess what? While I’m writing, I get to be a kid again – and what could be more fun!

Here are a few tips, based on what I’ve learned after writing eight middle-grade books.

  1. Kids like strong main characters, role models. Characters willing to take risks and sometimes mess up, but coming out on top in the end. Keep in mind the characters you liked as a child.
  2. Young people often act childish, but they can also be very mature, especially under pressure.
  3. The hero/heroine can possess extraordinary skills, but they still need to be real so readers can identify with them.
  4. Dialogue moves the story along, breaks up description and gets the reader to know characters better. Each character needs his/her own voice.
  5. Show emotion, don’t tell. This is true in all writing but especially when writing for kids. Instead of writing Jane was homesick, how about, Jane spent a lot of time looking at pictures of her family, often bursting into tears.
  6. Listen to kids talk so you get the lingo right. They are not teenagers so they won’t talk like them, not yet. They often parrot their parents and other adults around them.
  7. Watch movies and TV shows with kids in them, observe how they act and talk.
  8. Be aware that kids speak differently in different parts of the country, and the world.
  9. If you aren’t sure about something, ask a kid. I do this all the time. In fact, I have a street team of young readers from age 7 to 12. They are so helpful. Don’t ask a parent, they are the last to know how their kids talk or act!
  10. Kids are always giving me ideas. I keep a notebook and write down things they say and do, often incorporating these in my stories. They can be so clever too. Often wise beyond their years.

Writing for children is important because I want children to develop the same love of books I had as a child. A love that doesn’t fade with time. Children’s books create lifelong readers; readers who eventually buy adult books.

So if you have been thinking of writing for children, give it a try. Have fun and let yourself be a kid again!

 Thanks, Aurora, for the opportunity to talk about something I’m passionate about. If anyone has questions, I’d be happy to answer them in the comments.


About Darlene:

Darlene Foster is a Canadian author who has written the popular Amanda Travels series, featuring a spunky twelve-year-old who loves to travel to unique places where she encounters mystery and adventure while learning about another culture. Readers of all ages enjoy travelling with Amanda as she unravels one mystery after another in various countries. Darlene has won prizes for her short stories and a number of them have been published in anthologies. She has also written a bi-lingual book for English/Spanish readers.

 Darlene grew up on a ranch near Medicine Hat, Alberta, where her love of reading inspired her to travel the world and write stories. Over the years she held wonderful jobs such as an employment counsellor, ESL teacher, recruiter, and retail manager, and wrote whenever she had a few spare minutes. She is now retired and has a home in Spain where she writes full time. When not travelling, meeting interesting people, and collecting ideas for her books, she likes to spend time with her husband and entertaining dog, Dot.

Her books include Amanda in Arabia: The Perfume Flask, Amanda in Spain: The Girl in The Painting, Amanda in England: The Missing Novel, Amanda in Alberta: The Writing on the Stone, Amanda on The Danube: The Sounds of Music, Amanda in New Mexico: Ghosts in the Wind, and Amanda in Holland: Missing in Action. Amanda in Malta: The Sleeping Lady will be released in the spring of 2021. 


Connect with Darlene:

website http://www.darlenefoster.ca/

Blog https://darlenefoster.wordpress.com
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DarleneFosterWriter/
Twitter https://twitter.com/supermegawoman
Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/darlenefoster
Amazon author page https://www.amazon.com/Darlene-Foster/


 

Author Spotlight – Chiara Talluto

Welcome! 

Please introduce yourself. 

“I’m not a bestselling author, I’m just a ‘nobody’ who uses storytelling to encourage others to find their purpose and save their souls.”

 Hello, my name is Chiara Talluto. I’m a wife, busy mom, author, and a woman after God’s heart. As I ponder this declaration, I find it more appropriate to claim that I am a woman after God’s heart first. He has given me a gift of writing, and I honor Him through my written works.

People often ask what kind of writing I do. I tell them… I write Inspirational/Christian drama empowering women to discover their faith, use perseverance to overcome adversity, and become heroes of their own destinies. I also write middle-grade fantasy-fairy tales to encourage girls in developing strong morals and values, and to always stand up for what is right.

My family often tells me that I am the Master Storyteller in our household because I have a passion for writing about people who struggle with decisions and conflicts that arise in their lives.

In the last six years, I’ve been blessed to have published four books:  A Christian Romance, Love’s Perfect Surrender, two middle-grade fantasy-fairy tales: Petrella, the Gillian Princess and A Tribute to Tulipia, and an Inspirational fiction, She Made It Matter.

 

  1. When did you start writing?

 During my pre-teens, I began reading. I loved the Nancy Drew series and Hardy Boys books. The library was a couple miles away and I rode my bike to and from almost every day, I couldn’t get enough of the stories. I began keeping a journal at the age of eleven, and soon enough, I began writing poems. My love for the written word was sparked by all that reading. It wasn’t until my late teens that I discovered Danielle Steele novels and began to pen stories of my own. I continued writing longer prose as much as I could during a prosperous career as a Human Resources Recruiter, and then as an Instructional Designer. I received many awards and accolades for my accomplishments, and my work responsibilities grew, but there was something missing. I began to devote less and less time to my joy of writing. And soon, my creativity began to suffer. It wasn’t until after much soul-searching and some tough decision-making that I finally left the corporate world to start writing full-time. That was fifteen years ago. You could say I had a “premature midlife crisis”. Today, I am the CEO of my home, practicing wife to my husband, mommy to our two daughters, and writer of all things that need to be put on paper.

 

  1. What motivates you to write?

 I often tell people I have two addictions: reading and writing. I feel restless and empty when I can’t read fiction, write my deepest thoughts in my journal, or even write down story ideas. Writing calms me, centers me, and provides a healthy outlet for my communication with imaginary friends.

I write for the euphoric desire and need to transfer spiraling thoughts into words that move people emotionally, physically, and spiritually. I love taking everyday life situations and circumstances that people encounter, struggle and conquer, and turn it into creative storylines.

I balance my writing by doing one project at a time. That is, completing that “one” particular project. I can be writing, reading, editing many things at the same time, but once I know what I’m going to do with a writing project, I set a goal to complete it to the end.

 

  1. What genre do you write in and what made you chose this particular genre?

Sometimes this is a hard topic to answer. You see, I don’t want to be stuck in any particular genre, but I know my strong Catholic-Christian faith is what drives my writing. God has given me a talent to write and I write what He desires of me.

I never set out to be a writer, or a Christian writer for that matter, it just happened. It’s who I am and who I was meant to be. Writing is my outlet, a spilling of emotions, random thoughts, and imaginary characters that consume my mind twenty-four hours a day. I need to write, just like I need to eat, exercise, and breathe.

 

 

  1. What is your goal in writing? Do you have dreams where your writing should take you?

 I enjoy stories about human complexities. I like real-life stories, and have been drawn to writings that have a biblical theme, are motivational, and encouraging. I tell honest and compelling stories. I write relatable tales about ordinary people struggling with extraordinary challenges.

I’ve been told from others…” delve into challenging, emotional topics like miscarriage, adoption, challenged/physical disfigurements, alcoholism, bullying, going against family authority, etc.

My editor says…”tone-setting and picture-perfect.”

I’d like to use my stories to encourage female readers to explore their faith and believe they are worthy of this life to make a difference. Those readers who aren’t afraid to be challenged in everyday life. Those willing to sacrifice for the good of others, those readers who are struggling with life decisions and want to be inspired to change, grow, and leave tire marks. After all, we have just one life to live.

 

  1. Do you ever suffer from writer’s block and if yes, how do you deal with it?

 Yes, writer’s block has happened on more than several occasions. Sometimes it lasts for days, other times it lasts for months. What I do is not fret, but immerse myself in other projects, like blog writing, or short stories, writing prompts, and I try to read more. I also carry a notebook wherever I go, you never know when inspiration hits and you have to write it down.

 

  1. What advice would you like to give new, hopeful authors?

Keep on reading. Read many different types of books and authors.  See how others weave a tale. Write all the time too. Hone your craft. Make your words and story, yours, and yours alone.  Practice does make progress. And give yourself Grace to stumble because that will make you a better human.

  

  1. Please, tell us about your work.

 Straight from my Press Release:

From the three-time Five Star Readers’ Favorite REVIEW RECIPIENT, Chiara Talluto, author of Love’s Perfect  Surrender, Petrella, the Gillian Princess, and A Tribute To Tulipia, comes the highly anticipated release of She Made It Matter, an inspirational drama.

She Made It Matter is a compelling tale of one woman’s fight to regain sobriety, find salvation, and earn forgiveness after years of guilt from being abandoned by her mother and then losing her brother to cancer, a struggle to vanquish the demons of her past and make her life right again.

This story tackles the difficult subjects of family abandonment, alcohol abuse, and food dependencies; compulsions and addictions caused by the trauma of one’s past.

Amanda Reynolds is vulnerable. Like most humans we err and make mistakes, and harbor grudges and secrets that can create huge reservoirs of pain if not addressed. Amanda is stuck in the past, and stuck in the pain, and the only way to cope with it is alcohol.

WHILE WRITING the story, Chiara thought about her own idols and addictions and how she could break them. She thought about how a person with a perfect life is able to throw it all away over something that consumes their mind and body. She thought about a person who cannot move forward because of horrible past experiences. She pondered the ongoing domestic abuse and abandonment of children in our society. Most importantly, Ms. Talluto thought about the human condition, and the temptations that can lure one in the wrong direction.

Ms. Reynolds has to face her fears and QUASH the demons of her past so that she can live again. It is a daring attempt to confront things head on. But, we are encouraged to know that tough situations don’t last long; BUT tough people do.

… The work ABOUT addiction is heart-breakingly accurate, delivering a realistic emotional quality which both endears Amanda to us as a character and also teaches important real life lessons about the judgments we often place on people who are alcohol dependent… (K.C. Finn from Readers’ Favorite)

… Author Chiara Talluto gives the reader a realistic tale of someone searching for a purpose, for validation that they mean something, that they are worth more than just being left or abandoned… (Michelle Randall from Readers’ Favorite)

She Made It Matter is available in print and electronic editions everywhere books are sold. More information on the author and all her writings can be found at www.chiaratalluto.com.

She Made It Matter Book Jacket Synopsis

 Don’t turn back. Begin anew.

Thirty-six-year-old Amanda Reynolds has it all. She has a loving, successful husband, two beautiful daughters and a perfect, manicured home in a quaint suburb of Chicago.

But demons hide where no one looks and Amanda’s past is full of them—she’s addicted to alcohol. The reasons for her addiction have been buried for years.

One horrifying day, suppressed memories resurface and Amanda drinks herself into a stupor in front of her daughters. Waking up in the hospital, the realization is clear: get clean or lose everything.

Amanda sets off on a daring journey taking her across the US in an attempt to vanquish the demons that have plagued her life.

Will Amanda defeat her alcohol addiction?

Will her family forgive her?

Can she break away from her past, find her self-worth, and restart again?

Thank you for being my guest. It was such a pleasure to have you here!!


Connect with the author: 

Website: www.chiaratalluto.com

amazon.com/author/chiaratalluto

http://www.facebook.com/ChiaraTallutoAuthor

Twitter: @ChiaraTalluto

#ReadLocalAuthor –https://hometownreads.com

Smashwords – https://www.smashwords.com/books/search?query=Chiara+Talluto

Readers’ Favorite: https://readersfavorite.com/rfreviews/search?search=chiara+talluto

Authorsden: http://www.authorsden.com/chiaratalluto


Chiara’s Book:

Barnes and Noble

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/she-made-it-matter-chiara-talluto/1137747331?ean=9781734823707

 

Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/She-Made-Matter-Chiara-Talluto/dp/1734823704/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1602518270&sr=1-1

 

Smashwords

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1044555

 

 

 

Author Spotlight – Kevin Morris

Welcome! 

Please introduce yourself.

I was born in the city of Liverpool on 6 January 1969.

Having attended Saint Vincents School for the Blind in Liverpool, and the Royal National College for the Blind in Hereford, I went on to read history and politics at University College of Swansea.

Having graduated with a BA (joint honours) in history and politics, and an MA in political theory, I moved to London in 1994 where I now live and work.

Being blind and unable to read print, I use software called Job Access with Speech (JAWS) which converts text into speech and braille, enabling me to use a Windows laptop. All of my poems are written using JAWS.

When did you start writing?

I began writing seriously in 2012-2013, although I do remember composing a poem entitled “The Snake” whilst at school in Liverpool. I recollect that it began, “slithering through the wet grass comes the snake”.

What motivates you to write?

I enjoy the act of writing (the creation of poems). Indeed I sometimes believe that I have an itch which must be scratched, for when I do not write for a few days I feel a compulsion to put virtual pen to virtual paper.

What genre do you write in, and what made you chose this particular genre?

Most of my writing falls within the genre of poetry. I recollect with great pleasure leafing through works of poetry such as “Palgrave’s Golden Treasury” and “The Oxford Book of English Verse” in the school library. Reading these anthologies kindled in me a love of poetry which has stayed with me ever since, and has grown over the years.

What is your goal in writing? Do you have dreams where your writing should take you?

I write for the joy of the craft. I hope also that my poetry gives pleasure to others and perhaps encourages those unfamiliar with poetry to read more poetry. As for dreams, I am delighted that a number of my poems will be published in a forthcoming anthology of verse. Whilst I have, myself published several poetry collections, it is wonderful to know that my poems will appear alongside the work of other poets in an anthology.

Do you ever suffer from writer’s block, and if yes, how do you deal with it?

Fortunately I rarely suffer from writer’s block (he says touching wood)! However, when tired I turn off my computer as I know that if I do manage to write, what is written is likely to be of inferior quality.

What advice would you like to give new, hopeful authors? 

I would say to new authors “believe in yourself. By all means listen to what others have to say about your work and learn from that. But, ultimately you have to rely on your own judgement. If someone tells you to change something (and you believe that it works as written) then trust your own judgement. Also read widely”.

Please, tell us about your work.

Many of my poems (perhaps the majority) are written in my home which overlooks an historic park in the Upper Norwood area of Greater London. Norwood derives it’s name from The Great North Wood, and is still possessed of many fine trees.

I have written many poems inspired by the area in which I live, including the below poem which is entitled “The Path Through the Woods”:

 

“The path taken less often than I should,

This tranquil place through a nearby wood.

A spot with trees for walls

Where sunlight through the branches falls.

An oasis from the urban din

I find a quiet place within.

An inner space where the heart can be still,

A peaceful spot on this wooded hill.

The path to the road ascends.

A cloud of gloom on me descends.

I must return to this rented land

Where advertising hordings stand.

A world where empty vessels make most noise,

And people play with broken toys.”

—–

(Copyright Kevin Morris – Please respect the author’s right on his own word)


Kevin Morris’ Books:

“The Selected Poems of K Morris”, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WW8WXPP/.

 

 

 

 

 

“Light and Shade: Serious (and Not so Serious) Poems”, https://www.amazon.com/Light-Shade-serious-not-poems-ebook/dp/B08B4X3GVX/


Connect with Kevin Morris:

Author website, https://kmorrispoet.com/

Twitter, https://twitter.com/drewdog2060_

Goodreads, https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6879063.K_Morris

THE MAGICAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE WRITER AND THEIR NOTEBOOKS #AMWRITING – Written By Lucy Mitchell

Lucy Mitchell explains why there is a magical relationship between a writer and notebooks. Thanks so much for your post, Lucy! How many people don’t understand that bond.


#writingcommunity #writerslife

This weekend will be spent clearing out my dressing table and creating a temporary work desk. As I am working from home in my day job, the teenagers are off school due to half term, my husband is also working from home and we are in the middle of a strict lockdown, I cannot spend the next two weeks working from the living room. Not only will I have to put up with pyjama clad teens wandering about in the background while I am on Zoom calls, I will also have to listen to my loved one shouting at everyone to keep the noise down from his desk.

Underneath my dressing table there are three large boxes filled with notebooks. Some of my old stories were born inside these notebooks and some still reside between the pages. I have to write this post because I think my family believe this will be the weekend I finally clear out all my boxes of notebooks.

CONTINUE READING HERE