The Crucial First Page of Your Novel – Written By C.S. Lakin

Thanks for this very educational and interesting blog post, C. S. Lakin. The post was published on ‘Live Write Thrive’. Many of us appreciate your efforts.


Most authors know that the first pages of a novel are the most crucial and carry the weightiest burden in their entire book. The opening scene must convey so many things that often the author will have to rewrite it numerous times to get it right.

But the first page is especially crucial to get right.

Continue reading HERE

 

Writing that First Chapter: 10 Do’s and Don’ts for Starting Your Novel – Written By Anne R. Allen

Anne R. Allen’s new post informs us about 10 Do’s and Don’ts for starting a novel. Thanks so much for helping young authors with your blog post, Anne. I’m convinced that’s very helpful – and not only to young authors.


I’ve had questions from several writers recently about how to approach a first chapter. New writers hear so many rules about what they must do in the first line, first paragraph, and first chapter that they can feel paralyzed, afraid to write a word.

Let’s hope that NaNoWriMo is helping some of you fight that paralysis!

Yes, there are a lot of rules about writing a first chapter, but the truth is there are as many ways to start your novel as there are writers.

However, some openers are better than others for enticing a new reader, and beginning writers tend to fall into tired patterns that don’t always work. I know I did. We need to remember that the modern reader expects a story to start on page one.

So don’t take these as hard and fast rules. Professional writers break them all the time. They’re just tips. But they might help you in dealing with those first chapter blues.

Continue reading HERE

 

Updating Character Sheets

In January 2017 I published a blog post, asking if OneNote is a writer’s tool?

Since then many of you know that I use OneNote as a writer’s tool, not only to take notes, but to actively use it to take information, writing notes, reminders, and lists with me.

Since I am a big fan of OneNote, I also use it to create my character sheets.

Writing a series as the one I do now makes it necessary to keep track of my recurring and new characters and what better way is there to keep my characters as close to me as possible at all times than to use OneNotes?

Now, changing from my former desktop to my current laptop has lost me my entire OneNote. It almost broke my heart, until I realized that I did have one local copy on an external memory device. This means I got my brains together when I made a OneNote data backup. Unfortunately, this was an older version of all my notes. Big chunks of the writing notes were missing, and the character sheets were more or less on the basic character drafts.

Nobody can say I’m not learning from my mistakes and this disaster taught me a few things:

1. save your writer’s notes on a current device
2. make sure the data isn’t only on the cloud but also on the device
3. keep your character sheets as current as possible at all times

Point three has caused me sleepless nights. I realized that I occasionally took notes on the characters wherever I was and on whatever piece of paper I found, but rarely updated the character sheets with new developments.

In a series as of mine, there are definitely a number of characters, the planned returning ones and new ones that come up with the story of new books. When I started my series I had fourteen returning characters on the ‘Good’ side and at least eight characters on the ‘Bad’ side to begin with, and no matter how good I am, I cannot memorize every single small development each of these characters took with the progress of the series.

That means, right now, I’m busy searching my finished manuscripts and drafts for the developments that I had not written down in the character sheets.

I’m therefore spending some of my time reading, taking notes and updating character sheets, with the defined resolution to keep my character sheets up-to-date from now on! It is a lot of work, but I know it’s worth it.

After all, I want my books to be comprehensible and with no obvious character flaws.

While I wrote this blog post, I was asking myself if I’m the only one working like this? Am I complicated? Does that make sense? And how are other authors developing character sheets? Where do other authors keep them? If you can give me some advice, I’d be grateful to hear it in the comments. Thank you!

The Best 12 Free Grammar Check And Grammar Corrector Apps – Written By Derek Haines

Derek Haines provides us with the 12 best free Grammar Check and Grammar Correction Apps. Thanks so much, Derek. We really appreciate your work!


Here are 12 of the best free grammar check and grammar corrector tools for you to try

We are all writing so much now and for so many different reasons.

Bu no matter what level your writing skills are, an online grammar check is the easiest way to correct your grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

Word processors such as Microsoft Word do a very poor job. They can only perform a simplistic spell check and rarely find anything more than the most basic grammatical errors.

There are many online grammar checking tools that do a much better job of offering you suggested corrections. Some even give you an explanation or examples of grammatical rules.

To read the entire blog post, click here:

https://justpublishingadvice.com/the-best-12-free-grammar-check-and-grammar-corrector-apps/

25 Sites Where You Can Download Superb Free Stock Images – Written By Derek Haines

Derek Haines provides us with 25 pages where we can download pictures for free. Thank you very much Derek. We’re grateful for your help and support!


You always need free images for your blog or social media sites

The days of using Google Image Search to find images to download is over. Apart from the quality aspect, there are problems with the ownership of images indexed by Google.

If you want photos for personal and commercial use, you need to make sure that the images you use are copyright free.

You should also check if there are any attribution required notes on the image licence.

Most royalty free images have a Creative Commons licence.

To continue to Derek’s blog post go to:

https://justpublishingadvice.com/25-sites-where-you-can-download-superb-free-stock-images/

How to Add X-Ray to Your Kindle eBook

Chris McMullen provides us with an excellent blog post on how to add x-ray to our kindle e-book. Thanks for all your efforts Chris.

chrismcmullen

X-ray picture licensed from ShutterStock.

X-RAY FOR KINDLE

Authors can add X-ray to their Kindle eBooks via KDP.

Here is how to do it:

  • Visit Kindle Direct Publishing at kdp.amazon.com.
  • After you login, visit your KDP Bookshelf.
  • Hover your cursor over the gray button with three dots (…) near the right of one of your book titles.
  • If available, you will see an option to Launch X-Ray. Click this link.
  • This will open the X-Ray page for your Kindle eBook, but you won’t be able to do anything yet.
  • Click the yellow button to Request X-Ray. The window will automatically close 20 seconds later and return you to your Bookshelf.
  • You should receive an email once X-Ray is prepared for your Kindle eBook. Although it says it can take a few hours, my emails came within minutes.
  • Now you need to return to your KDP Bookshelf and Launch X-Ray…

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