December/January 2017/2018 Writing Contests

Thank you, Rachel Poli, for all your efforts once again to inform us about the December/January writing contests.

Rachel Poli

December 2017

Genre: Fiction
Theme: N/A
Website: The Writing District
Deadline: December 30, 2017
Entry Fee: N/A
Prize: $50

Genre: Fiction
Theme: Family Matters
Website: Glimmer Train
Deadline: December 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $18
Prize: First – $2,500

Genre: Essay
Theme: Topics are on website
Website: ExpertAssignmentHelp
Deadline: December 31, 2017
Entry Fee: N/A
Prize: $450

January 2018

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: Christmas and Holiday Collection 2018
Website: Chicken Soup For The Soul
Deadline: January 10, 2018
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: The Empowered Woman
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: January 10, 2018
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: The Miracle of Love
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: January 15, 2018
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

Genre: Fiction
Theme: N/A
Website: Literal Latte
Deadline: January 15, 2018
Entry Fee: $10
Prize: $1,000

Please be sure to read through the guidelines for each…

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How To Use LinkedIn ProFinder

I am getting ready. Step by slow step I’m getting ready to be published. (And please, remember the word ‘slowly.’)

I have a cover for the first book, even though it’s still not completely edited. But I hope that will soon be done too. Now I know I need help for the next step. After not getting along anymore with my once hired copyright lawyer, I decided to pick a new, trustworthy copyright lawyer who can help me with his knowledge. Easier said than done. Where do I find one? And believe me, I didn’t feel like going through the phone book.

That was when I remembered that I have one of the worldwide most used professional networks available. I was sure it could help me… And it was so easy!

First I used the ‘search’ function on LinkedIn and entered “Copyright lawyer”:

 

LinkedIn showed me two lawyers AND on top, the hint to ProFinder with the button “Get free proposals”. I wasn’t happy with neither one of the shown lawyers and decided to click the ‘free proposals’-button.

 

It took me right to


 

Of course I had to answer a few questions, which I did:

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At the very end, all I had to do was clicking the “Get free proposals” and wait. It didn’t take too long I got a reply from a copyright lawyer in my neighborhood who I contacted back. We chatted, then talked for a bit on the phone – and I’ll visit him soon to complete the documents and agreement between lawyer and client.

I got what I needed. And I’m sure I’ll be using ProFinder again. It’s very easy.

 

Are You Using AMS? Here’s How To Respond To Clicking Disasters

Another post from Nicholas Rossis. He informs us about using AMS and how to respond to clicking disasters. Thank you Nicholas!

Nicholas C. Rossis

Fake Books | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksI hope you will never have any use for today’s post, but it could be a lifesaver if you are hit by the so-called “clicking disaster.” If you’re using Amazon Marketing Services (AMS), you will have noticed that the reporting system is somewhat… unreliable. However, there are times when the AMS reporting goes completely bonkers. This has been reported by a number of authors who use AMS, and who notice huge spikes (up to 1,000%) in their campaign clicks.

Now, you may think that this is a good thing. And it would be if there was a corresponding increase in sales. Alas, that is not the case: clicking disasters mean that the AMS reporting vastly overrepresents clicks, but the actual sales (as reported by KDP) are not affected by this.

Why Is This Bad?

Well, there are two reasons why this should worry you. First, since you pay for…

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Different Types of Closure

Charles Yallowitz provides us with a post on his blog “Legends of Windermere”, describing different types of closure. I love the article. Thank you, Charles.

Legends of Windemere

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I’ve said in previous posts that one of the most important parts of concluding a series is creating closure. You need to bring things to an end, which isn’t as easy as some people think.  In fact, one of the reasons it can be so tough is because you have a variety of closure types to choose from.  It depends a lot on what you’re going for, but even planning doesn’t alleviate all the pressure.  So, what are the types?

  1. Classic Good Ending– All of the good guys get what they wanted and all of the bad guys got what they deserved.  It’s the oldest type of closure in the book.  Nothing messy and no risk of people feeling it’s a downer.  Though, you might get called out for being weak and unoriginal.
  2. Classic Bad Ending– I’m not sure how long it took for someone…

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How to Tailor Your Resume — Tips for Writers

Nicholas Rossis with an interesting and helpful post about writer’s resumes. Thank you, Nicholas!

 

Nicholas C. Rossis

Victoria Sawtelle | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's book

This is the second part of a 3-part series dealing with alternative ways of making a living through writing. Victoria Sawtelle is a community manager at Uptowork – a career blog with +1.5 million monthly readers. I agreed to share this guest post because they have created an amazingly detailed guide on how to make a writer’s resume, with over 30 examples and detailed, step-by-step instructions. Uptowork has kindly agreed to offer my readers free access to their resume builder, so if anyone’s interested, use the free trial code ZgyI50xW.

How to Tailor Your Resume — Tips for Writers

Ghostwriting | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Image: rainbowriting.com

You’re a writer.

You’ve written copy for newsletters, popular guides for blogs, and insightful articles for news outlets.

You’ve rewritten more buzzword-loving execs you care to count.

Ghostwriting? Been there, done that.

Plus, there’s that novel you’re working on.

You can write it all—

But for an…

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CreateSpace eStore is Closing Effective October 31, 2017

Chris Mullen informs us about CreateSpace closing their e-store. Thank you very much for sharing the news!

chrismcmullen

Image from ShutterStock.

CREATESPACE ESTORE IS CLOSING

Beginning October 31, 2017, customers will no longer be able to purchase paperbacks directly from the CreateSpace eStore.

If you have a link to your CreateSpace eStore and a customer clicks on it, the customer will be redirected to the corresponding page at Amazon.com.

According to CreateSpace, the reasons behind the change include:

  • It’s much easier to search for books across Amazon’s site than it is to search for books on CreateSpace.
  • Amazon offers a much better checkout process than CreateSpace does.
  • Amazon offers better shipping options, including Amazon Prime.
  • Amazon sends out tracking notifications for orders placed through Amazon.
  • Amazon’s storefront is a much more familiar interface for customers.
  • Several customers have requested the features described above.

Unfortunately, when a customer clicks on a link to a CreateSpace eStore and is redirected to Amazon, authors will earn Amazon.com royalties (not eStore…

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As a Writer, What Inspires You?

Don Massenzio published an article about inspiration.

Author Don Massenzio

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How many of you can relate to the sentiment in this graphic? Do you wake up every morning excited about writing? Is writing a natural part of your life?

If so, what inspires you to embrace this obsession? The purpose of this post is to attempt to determine the things that drive us to write and to not give up. Many of us our independent authors (I prefer this term over self-published). We outsource our publishing to platforms like Amazon, CreateSpace and others. We use cover designers and editors just as a traditional publisher would or perform these services on our own.

Why do we do this without a guarantee that anyone will read our work? Here are some of my reasons.

GoalWriting has been a lifelong goal Since my childhood I have been enthralled with books. I read everything I could get my hands on and wrote…

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