How To Survive Admitting You Cannot Commit To A Genre Because You Want To Explore Other Things #MondayBlogs #Writer

Lucy Mitchell of Blonde Write More provides us with an interesting post about not committing to a genre. Thank you Lucy.

 

BlondeWriteMore

I feel like I owe the genre of romantic comedy an explanation as I am not currently writing stories from it and I have no intention of returning just yet.

Admitting you cannot commit to a genre because you have urges to write stories from other genres can be tough, especially when those around you believe you should be staying true to your genre roots.

I didn’t make a conscious decision to write stories from other genres. I wasn’t looking for stories from other genres. Some characters turned up inside my head one day and persuaded me to follow them.

We’re not married to our genres so why do we sometimes feel obliged to only write stories from them?

I know quite a few good writers and authors who have stuck to their genre and remained devoted. I admire them for this.

However, I want to go explore other things…

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When to Show and When to Tell

Ryan Lanz of ‘A Writer’s Path’ tells us when to show and when to tell. Thank you for a great post Ryan.

A Writer's Path

by Kyle Massa

Show, don’t tell.

If you’ve ever taken a writing course of any kind, you’ve probably heard that phrase.

If you haven’t, the meaning is pretty simple: don’t come out and tell your readers everything they need to know. Instead, show them examples and specific situations that support what you’re trying to say. Doing so often solidifies your points a little better than straight telling.

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This Week in Indie Publishing

I found a very interesting blog post on Don Massenzio’s blog. Thanks for sharing this Don!

Author Don Massenzio

Traditionally Published Authors Want What Indies Have

When self-published authors like Amanda Hocking became book industry names, it was for reaching incredible sales figures on the fairly new Kindle e-reading platform. After reaching newsworthy levels of success, Hocking and others like her attracted the attention of literary agents and publishers looking to reach consumers. Experts would often question why an author who was already on the bestseller list would possibly be convinced to give a sizeable portion of their royalties; the answer was almost always the same: “I’m tired of being a businessman, I want to go back to being a writer.”

Essentially, self-published authors who “took the deal,” as people claimed, were looking for support that they either had to pay for out of pocket or do themselves. Marketing was a major reason for this, along with publishing services like cover design and editing. The work of being that…

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You need to double your Amazon security

Jean M. Cogdell provides us with valuable information, hints and tipps about amazon security. Thank you very much Jean.

Jean's Writing

You heard right.

Time to double security and protect your books on Amazon. 

Now, not only do I need to work on this year’s taxes, but looks as if I may need to work on my Amazon account.

What the hell? Hackers are now invading Amazon? You’ve got to be kidding me.

I feel as if I’m playing Wack-a-Mole trying to avoid hackers and stupid people. This is getting ridiculous. I change my passwords from time to time, but now I’ve got to do more to keep these crooked jerks out.

Thanks to Janice Hardy over at Fiction University for the warning.

Here’s what I learned today about Amazon Security…

  • Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) accounts are linked to my regular Amazon account.
  • Hackers attempt to break into customer Amazon accounts every single day.
  • If a Hacker gains access to my Amazon account they have access to my KDP.
  • A Hacker will…

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Looking for Guest Posts…

Allan Krummeracker’s blog is expecting guests. Apply for guest posts folks, it’s such a GREAT chance!! He’s an amazing writer and I love his blog.

Musings Of Two Creative Minds

Calling-All-Authors

Running a blog can be tiring work…  and running a second one:

“The Vampyre Blogs – Private Edition” link: https://thevampyreblogs.wordpress.com/)

can be exhausting

983b7-tired-dog


So having guest bloggers who wish to get exposed to a wider audience is a real plus, plus it gives our readers a better idea of what other books and authors are out there.  So if you’re interested in doing a guest post about writing, or wish promote your work here on this blog, please let us know in the comment section below.

Or you can e-mail us at: allan.krummenacker@gmail.com.  Tell us about yourself and what you’d like to share and how soon you’d like the post to run.  We’ll do our best to accommodate your needs and if we can’t we’ll let you know.   Keep in mind NO PORNOGRAPHY.  We have readers from many age ranges and backgrounds so we need to keep things within…

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Weird Side Of Famous Writers – by Jack Milgram

 

How well do you know your favorite writers?

Have you checked out their biographies, or does your knowledge end at the list of books they’ve written?

Whatever the case may be, some writers have a side that very few people even know about. And it’s a pretty weird side. We’re talking about the strange habits and other quirks that some of the most famous writers have.

And we want to uncover some of them in our infographic. We’ve identified 20 famous authors who are known to have strange habits. This infographic clearly shows that sometimes it’s not only talent and outstanding work that can make people talk about writers.
Make sure to check out the infographic and you’ll surely learn something new about the listed authors you never knew before.

 

Author’s biography

I have been interested in writing since I made the acquaintance of pen and paper. My first letters were really funny, and my mom still keeps them as mementoes. However, as soon as I learned how to write words, I started forming them into sentences. And do you know what my first sentence said? “I love my words”. It was written so ineptly that it looked more like “I love my weird”. When I was younger and played in a band I also started writing poems, but to be honest, prose is much easier for me and I’m doing much better focusing on exactly that. I started writing, but often left unfinished, many of my essays at school, as well as my researches at college, where I studied psychology and education. I started freelance writing when I was a student. I have never found sitting in an office appealing, and a world traveler is actually my true alter-ego. That is why freelancing was my career solution. And now, here you are, reading my tips and guidance for my favorite occupation while I am actually doing what I love all over the world.

Contact Jack Milgram

Blog:  CW blog

Email: milgram.jack@yahoo.com

Twitter: @Jack__Milgram

Facebook: Jack.Milgram

Don’t Judge A Book By Its Cover

… and still, we all do it, right? I’m not the exception to the rule either. Often I catch myself judging a person I don’t know because I don’t like her jacket. But I don’t know what happened to her that her jacket looks as ragged as it does.

But let’s stay within the literary world. Like so many other writers and readers, I love spending time in bookstores. I browse through the shelves and aisles, and occasionally I pick one, turn it around and start reading the blurb on the back.

My eyes fly over the shelves, and once in a while, they are caught by a particularly attractive and intriguing book cover. If I don’t like the cover, I don’t even bother reading a blurb, means I might miss a few good books, just because my eye isn’t attracted to the books’ cover.

Over the years I saw a few very interesting and eye-catching covers, and by a couple, I was quite fascinated.

Now, these five here, are only a few that impressed me and my eye in particular. To some of you, they might be weird, sad or even boring. This blog post and these covers are my taste.

Picture courtesy of: http://www.google.com

 

Cover designer: Jim Tierney

I love how the designer mixes color and the trace of antique and ancient. It’s not often we discover a new book with an ‘old’ cover.

 

 

 

 

Picture courtesy of: http://lithub.com/the-64-best-book-covers-of-2017/

 

Cover designer: Peter Mendelsund

I love the colorful simplicity of the book cover. It seems to be one simple compass needle, but I was drawn in when I saw this cover.

 

 

 

 

Picture courtesy of: https://litreactor.com/columns/the-best-horror-book-covers-ever

 

Designer team:

Bob Giusti (illustration)
Amy Hill (lettering)

This I call a perfect symbiosis between illustration and lettering. It can’t get any simpler than this, any darker, any more impressive – and any scarier.

 

 

 

Picture courtesy of: http://lithub.com/the-60-best-book-covers-of-2016-as-chosen-by-designers/

 

Designer: Na Kim

I cannot even tell whether this book cover is ‘intriguing’ or repelling… but it definitely is fascinating. And in combination with this book title it has a lot to say.

 

 

 

 

 

Picture courtesy of: http://www.pinterest.com

 

Cover designer: Anne Jordan

The cover caught my eye immediately. Why would a reader and writer like me not be intrigued by a turning page? I briefly looked at the book and found that I had to add it to my growing pile of books I need to read.

 

 

 

Are there covers you like? And I know, I got a lot to learn and many people to meet, cover designers amongst them. Who do you know, being a cover designer or illustrator and designed the perfect cover for your book?

Or what book cover do you particularly love?