How To Plan The Crime In Your Mystery Novel [Mystery Month]

Rachel Poli provides us with an interesting and informative post on “How to plan a crime”, including a ‘checklist’. This is great! Thank you, Rachel!

Rachel Poli

We’ve talked about this before, but I think it’s always good to revisit old chats. In fact, this is the third time I’m revising this post!

If you know me, you know that I prefer to outline my novels before writing them. While freewriting is fun, I like to know where I’m going with my story. I don’t like to get stuck, I just like to write. Sometimes it changes, but I have a basic idea.

When it comes to writing a mystery novel, when there is a crime and something has to be solved, it’s easy to know what exactly is going to happen ahead of time. Otherwise, you may end up with a baffling case – in and out of the story.

How To Plan A Crime In Your Mystery Novel | Mystery Month

Even if you don’t like to outline, planning out the crime in your story is always a good idea. When you read books or watch…

View original post 598 more words

Language Generator for Fantasy and Sci-Fi

Kristen Twardowski informs us with an exciting blog post about “Vulgar”, a language generator for Sci-Fi and Fantasy writers. Thanks so much Kristen.

Kristen Twardowski

I’ve talked about my fascination with language before, but sometimes writers need a little help creating words that make sense in their nascent worlds. I recently found something that streamlines that process.

Vulgar (pardon the terrible name) is a constructed language generator. The generator creates fully realized languages; if you were truly ambitious you could learn some of them. The program attempts to mimic real languages, so there are patterns to the words that develop. For instance, in 50% of generated languages, the word for “tongue” is the same as the word for “language”, and words often share roots as is the case for:

pson /pʂon/ n. paint; v. paint
psopru /ˈpʂopru/ n. painter

I’ve played around with the generator quite a bit and am highlighting a few sample languages below.

Vulgar Zulia.JPG via Vulgar

Vulgar Nahis.JPG via Vulgar

The above screenshots simply capture the summaries for the languages. The full pages, however…

View original post 171 more words

A Simple Guide to Book Advances and Royalties

A Writer’s Path’ Ryan Lance has written a very informative and simple guide to book advances and royalties. Thank you very much!

A Writer's Path

by Gary Smailes

When a book publisher offers a book deal to a new author, the contract will talk about ‘advances’ and ‘royalties’. These can be a little confusing to new authors, though a little bit of knowledge will go a long way to helping you fully understand what you are being offered.

In this article, you will learn about royalties and advances, you will discover what is usual for a book publisher to offer and you will find out how the publishing world is changing the way it provides advances and royalties.

View original post 1,164 more words

Fashion For Characters IV

This is the fourth blog post I wrote about Fashion for Characters. The first post I talked about Fashion for Historical Romance, the second about Science Fiction characters and their fashion. The last one was about “my own” genre, fashion for characters in Paranormal Romance.

Today it’s time for fashion in the ‘Fantasy’ genre.

Depending on the characters we’re going to dress, ‘fantasy’ means, we authors are quite free in how to dress our characters.

I impossibly can dress every fantasy character existing in our heads. That’s why I picked just a few.

Let’s start with fairies. What is a fairy to most of us? I would say, a little, thumb sized winged cute nature spirit, able to project herself in human size, if necessary. We can dress her into so many different dresses. I would say: most typical ones would be these:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These, of course, are only examples. Our fantasy is unlimited, and so is our taste. Many other writers might have completely different imaginations of how to dress their fairies.

 

********************************

.

Let’s see what we can do about getting our naked elves ready for the public. 😀

What are elves? In my imagination, they’re the taller magic version of fairies, without the wings. (I might, however, be slightly influenced by Mr. Tolkien, but this is not necessarily a bad thing though).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

**********************************

 

The next supernatural creature I would like to dress are witches – or magicians. I’m not talking about the fairy tale witch with the pointed hat and the broom. In my head these are more women, using nature and symbols to perform magic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

*********************************************

 

Of course, there are many more female fantasy characters. I decided on warriors and hunters to be dressed next. In my imagination they’re mysterious, fascinating and at the same time impressive:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

************************************

And last, but not least, there are the princesses, queens, and regents. Of course, we are convinced they’re wearing beautiful dresses. In my head, these might be beautiful dresses for them:

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**************************************

 

Let me know what you think how your fantasy women should be dressed, please. I’d love to read your imagination in my comments.

 

I hope you had as much fun reading these fashion posts as I had writing them.

***********************************************************************************

(All pictures are courtesy of http://www.pinterest.com)

How to Embed Tweets in Your Blog Post

Sarah Brentyn of “Lemon Shark” provides us with great blogging tips. Thank you, Sarah!

Lemon Shark

lemon-shark-screen-shot-sarahb

Tweets aren’t just for Twitter anymore.

Here’s a neat thing you can do with those tweets right here on your WordPress blog. It’s wicked cool. And easy. 3 steps…done.

All of you lovely bloggers know I’m not a techie but I wanted to share this fun find with you.

I have visuals, too, which is awesome. Admittedly, I went a bit bonkers with the arrows but…you get the point. (I know. I’m hilarious.)

First we’re going old school with a “cut and paste” URL option, then we’ll embed an html code like we know what we’re doing.

No need to hurt your eyes squinting at the screenshots—you can click to enlarge them. Let’s get tweeting on our blogs.

Copy Link Option:

STEP ONE:

Choose the tweet you want. Click on the cute, little grey v-shaped thingy in the top, right corner.

Click to enlarge

STEP TWO:

You’ll see a drop-down…

View original post 317 more words

I’m Having a Love Affair With ‘Had’!

Jan R. provides us with an amazing post about a ‘love affair with “had”‘. Thank you very much!

Writing your first novel-Things you should know

aid174983-v4-728px-Stop-Saying-the-Word-_Like_-Step-4-Version-2On more than one occasion I have declared my love affair with the word ‘had’. When you use a word so many times it jumps off the page, you have a problem. It doesn’t matter if the word is used correctly or not. You need to find another way to write the sentence without using ‘the word’. In my case that word is ‘had’.

What’s wrong with using the word ‘had’ over and over, besides making it an awkward read?

  • If you are using ‘had’ a lot, odds are you have a lot of backstory/info dump, because it specifically details things that happened before the current action. In some circumstances, that can seem dull, or like the focus is in the wrong place. Why spend so much time on something that’s not happening right now?
  • Using ‘had’ too much can also indicate you are telling vs. showing.
  • ‘Had’ is also rather formal…

View original post 294 more words

…the day it rained money… and we couldn’t laugh…

Seumas Gallacher provided us with a wonderful and funny memory. Thanks for the giggle, Master Gallacher!! We appreciate you let us have a peek into your past.

Seumas Gallacher

…I s’pose yeez would’ve had to be there… but I’ve been giggling away all morning at the memory of it… come with me, back more than 50 years… picture the young Master Gallacher, newly minted apprentice at the redoubtable Clydesdale & North of Scotland Bank Limited, Govan Cross Branch in Docklands Govan in Glasgow… the freshest Trainee Master of the Financial Universe... the personnel in the branch were great guys… the Manager, Mister George Galloway, the epitome of the pin-striped Scottish Banker, defender of his clients’ pennies and bawbees… bowler hat and constantly furled umbrella as much a part of his uniform as his distinguished manner of addressing staff and customers alike… his number two, nominally adorned with the title, the Bank Accountant,MisterWilliam (call me Bill) Melvin, was a man with the detachable banker’s daily stiff white collar on his immaculately white shirts and…

View original post 339 more words