…Jack Calder, past… Jack Calder, present… Jack Calder, future…

Our ‘ol’ Scots Jurassic scribbler’ Seumas Gallacher, leads his Jack Calder to a new path. Go friend!!

Seumas Gallacher

…if there’s anything this ol’ Scots Jurassic scribbler has learned in ten years of producing his wee literary masterpieces is that NUTHIN stands still in the publishing industry for long, whether that be in the realm of the self-publishing tribes, or the mystic corridors of the ‘Large Houses’with stables of contracted authors… like many of us, I’ve dabbled, and more than dabbled at times, with self-publishing eBooks on Auntie Amazon Kindle… with paperback printed copies through the slalom of censorship in the Middle East, involving hand-to-hand combat with head buyers at the major retail book distributors in this part of the WURLD… engaged for a short while with a small publishing house… experimented with an agent arrangement for an equally brief spell… both of these latter experiences ending with amicable partings of the way… comes now the latest foray for Master Gallacherthe beckoning universe of…

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Different Types of Closure

Charles Yallowitz provides us with a post on his blog “Legends of Windermere”, describing different types of closure. I love the article. Thank you, Charles.

Legends of Windemere

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I’ve said in previous posts that one of the most important parts of concluding a series is creating closure. You need to bring things to an end, which isn’t as easy as some people think.  In fact, one of the reasons it can be so tough is because you have a variety of closure types to choose from.  It depends a lot on what you’re going for, but even planning doesn’t alleviate all the pressure.  So, what are the types?

  1. Classic Good Ending– All of the good guys get what they wanted and all of the bad guys got what they deserved.  It’s the oldest type of closure in the book.  Nothing messy and no risk of people feeling it’s a downer.  Though, you might get called out for being weak and unoriginal.
  2. Classic Bad Ending– I’m not sure how long it took for someone…

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My Writing Progress – 4

In my last ‘Writing Progress’ post, I wrote about finishing the draft of my second book in the series which I just had drafted by then. In the meantime, I had typed it in, edited it and sent it to my editor. It, in fact, turned out to be a novel, not a novella, like the other two books, number one and three in the series.

Shortly before I went on vacation, I had finished drafting the fourth book in the series. I posted this in my newsletter, and I’m still very proud of it.

I took the fifth and sixth book of the series with me on vacation. I had started both but wasn’t too far yet. But my friend’s backyard and pool were extremely calming and relaxing and tickled my fantasy. It’s November, and even though I’m not a participant in the NaNoWriMo, I still finished the fifth book of the series and continued the sixth one.

I’m very surprised, but then I shouldn’t be. I love writing this series and create these characters in each book and meet the existing ones again is such an adventure for me.

I hope very much you will meet some of them soon.

At this point, I do feel a bit worried about my editor being ‘overflowed’ with my manuscripts. And I have to type in two more novellas as quickly as possible.

Wish me luck.

 

 

 

Picture courtesy of google.com

…being a self-publishing author… a ‘stigma’ I’ll gladly live with…

I love how author Seumas Gallacher describes his feelings on how to be a self-published author. In his eyes this isn’t necessary a “stigma”, it’s a blessing. Thank you Seumas. There is a reason why you’re loved around the world!

Seumas Gallacher

…it has been ten years, almost to the day, when this ol’ Scots Jurassic decided it was just ‘time to write that novel we all have in us’… what started as a personal ‘bucket list’ item evolved into an amazing scribbler’s journey, which sustains its magic for me to this day… I trudged the newbie author’s familiar road to literary destiny as so many, many others before me… letters to prospective agents and publishing houses… rejections by the sheaf-load… the first novel tentatively prodded onto Auntie Amazon Kindle… followed by the second, the third, and now #6 is Work-in-Progress… the realisation that the SOSYAL NETWURKS held the key to reaching out to a potential global readership… the building of a blog following… the learning curves (plural!) of proofreading, cover art, editing, pricing mechanisms… discovering various distribution channels… add in the continual scourge of piracy that criminally robs we…

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…Authors, are yeez serious about a series?… Tony McManus shares his views…

Seumas Gallacher hosts author Tony McManus who informs us writers about book series. Since I am working on a series myself, this of course, is of enormous interest for me. And I’m sure I’m not the only one.

Seumas Gallacher

…as a writer of a crime thriller series myself, my pal Tony McManus‘s WURDS are of more than passing interest to me…

BRINGING THE CURTAIN DOWN

Though it may be a well-written prize winner, a one-off book, a stand-alone novel, has little chance of commercial success in today’s reading market. The mass of readers wants recurring heroes, protagonists who return to deliver the goods of more adventures. It’s something a reader can look forward to and feel comfortable with. Series novels are the thing. And looking back, reading of the army of fans who followed Arthur Conan-Doyle and eagerly awaited his latest Sherlock Holmes treat, I feel it’s always been so. Now it’s big time.

Series novels are invariably thrillers in the crime, mystery and espionage genres. Some come about by accident. They begin with a single book, which is then followed by another, perhaps a sequel, and then…

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Trying To Write In Another Genre

A good friend of mine reminded me of something that happened a while ago.

He told me that life had given him some challenges currently and sometimes his head is full of thoughts about how to accomplish his tasks. At the moment he does have difficulties to write. He sits down, waiting for creativity to kick in and nothing happens.

Is this writer’s block? I don’t know, and since I’m not a too experienced writer, I would never presume to ‘diagnose’ such an excellent and gifted writer as he is. Much smarter heads and experienced writers have dealt with writer’s block before. I even published a post about it in February 2015 “Kiss Your Muse Hello.”

But what he said reminded me of something that happened a while back and made me laugh. And yes, I told him about it.

A while back when I realized my fantasy ran dry, I tried to tickle it by writing something I normally do not write.

As many of you know, I’m a writer of Paranormal Romance and Fantasy. But at this moment I decided, I would try to write a hot, steamy, and romantic, erotic scene. Occasionally I do read a sexy novel, and I was curious how I would do.

When I had finished the scene, I was quite proud of myself. I found it turned out to describe what I just saw going on in my head.

 

Picture courtesy of: http://www.pinterest.com

 

I set the few pages aside and went on to ‘daily business,’ whatever that was at this time.
I have to mention here: my idea did work. Writing in this unknown genre, in fact, awakened my ideas and fantasy, and I was able to continue with my new story.

I had nearly forgotten about my short trip into the erotic genre until I one day got the few papers in my hand while searching for some documents.

Sitting down and leaning back I re-read them…

… and started laughing so hard, I nearly choked. I screamed and howled with laughter. Earlier in this post, I said, after writing it, I was proud, I had considered I exactly described as the scene was in my head, right?

Re-reading these pages now showed me that I was completely wrong.

In my head, the scenery and what happened was perfect, yes. Including the smells, the sounds, the whispers… but on the paper, the entire erotic, sexy, steamy scene was about as erotic as the mating of gummy bears.

 

Picture courtesy of http://www.google.com

 

I figured, and I still do, that there must be a reason, why I picked ‘Paranormal Romance’ and ‘Fantasy’ my genres. Apparently ‘steamy hot’ is not for me to describe. I deeply admire every writer who can do it.

Now there are two questions at this point: Are the current stories I write that far off from my imagination as well? This would suck; even though my editor said no (which calms me a little bit).

And the second question: Have you ever tried to write in another genre, and how did this work for you? Thanks for sharing your experiences.