Titles – How Important Are They and How Do You Come Up With Them?

Author Don Massenzio informs us about title and how important they are. Thank you for this great article, Don!

Author Don Massenzio

Many authors who write book series, James Patterson, Janet Evanovich and Sue Grafton, to name a few, have written books that have common words in them. Patterson uses the word ‘Cross’, as in his character, Alex Cross, in such books as Cross My Heart, Cross Country, etc. Interestingly enough, however, he started out titling his Alex Cross books with nursery rhyme references like Along Came a Spider and Jack and Jill. 

Janet Evanovich uses numbers for her Stephanie Plum novels. She started with One for the Money and is about to release Hardcore Twenty Four. Sue Grafton used the more limiting letter scheme for her titles. Starting with A is for Alibi, she is now about to release Y is for Yesterday. Having titles like these for a series is a great marketing idea and, in the case of Evanovich and Grafton, it gives you an idea…

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37 Top Book Awards for Authors in 2017

Scott Lorenz, a Book Publicist, informs us about book awards for authors. Thank you very much Scott, this is very helpful.

The Book Publicist

Book Awards for Authors

Enter Book Award Contests and Become an Award Winning Author in 2017!

By Scott Lorenz

Westwind Communications

“Do book awards matter?”  YES!!

As a book publicist I can assure you they absolutely do matter! One client won several awards and was contacted by two movie producers about her Young Adult Sci-Fi Fantasy Fiction novel.  Another one of my clients won the prestigious Los Angeles Book Festival award. That then led to a flurry of media interest, which subsequently led to a major New York agent deciding to represent the book and pitch it to all the major publishing houses. This author, needless to say, was happy he decided to enter.

You win awards you sell more products.  Jeff Bezos, CEO Amazon

Jeff Bezos at the 2016 Code Conference Jeff Bezos at the 2016 Code Conference (Photo news.techniblogic.com

Recently a business book client won a major award which caused CNN to reach out to request the book.

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September/October 2017 Writing Contests

Thanks to Rachel Poli’s efforts we are updated once again on the upcoming September/October 2017 writing contests. Thank you so much Rachel!

Rachel Poli

September/October 2017 writing contest deadlinesSeptember 2017

Genre: Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, or Poetry
Theme: None
Website: Still: The Journal
Deadline: September 9, 2017
Entry Fee: $12
Prize: First – $200

Genre: Essay
Theme: None
Website: Literal Latte
Deadline: September 30, 2017
Entry Fee: $10/1 essay or $15/2 essays
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: My Crazy Family
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: September 30, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

October 2017

Genre: Poetry
Theme: N/A
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: (Early bird) October 2, 2017
Entry Fee: $15
Prize: First – $1,000

Genre: Popular fiction (romance, YA, thriller, crime, horror, sci-fi)
Theme: N/A
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: (Early bird) October 16, 2017
Entry Fee: $20
Prize: First – $2,500

Genre: Fiction
Theme: Short story (new writers only)
Website: Glimmer Train
Deadline: October 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $18
Prize: First – $2,500

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: Christmas and Holiday
Website: Chicken Soup for the…

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Characterization Tips – What to Avoid, Where to Focus

Author Don Massenzio provides us with tips on characterization. Thank you very much Don. These are very helpful!

Author Don Massenzio

This post is focused on a very important, if not the most important, aspect of your writers, your characters. Readers become invested in characters. They learn to love and/or hate characters. They sympathize and/or empathize with their flaws, quirks and events that shape them. Character development is both essential and difficult.

In this post, I hope to pull together some useful tips that I have tried to follow in my own writing or have learned from those that are respected and successful in the craft.

quote1

  • Be consistent with what you call your characters – If you’re character’s name is John Doe, stick with calling him John or Mr. Doe or Johnny. But don’t alternate or you will confuse your readers. I actually broke this rule in my first book, Frankly Speakingand in it’s subsequent related books, I have a character named Clifford Jones, III. He is an attorney…

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71 Ways To Slowly Kill Your Blog

Hugh from ‘Hugh’s Views And News” provides us with a list of 71 ways to slowly kill your blog. Thanks for useful advice, Hugh! This is great for all bloggers.

Hugh's Views & News

I’ve got murder on my mind. Are you responsible for any of these?

  1. Do not have an ‘about me’ page on your blog
  2. Your ‘about me’ page takes more than a few seconds to find
  3. Your ‘about me’ page starts with these words – ‘this is an example of an about me page…’
  4. The number of followers you have is more important to you than what you write
  5. Poor quality posts
  6. Have broken links on your blog which you have no idea are broken or can not be bothered to fix
  7. Do not respond to comments
  8. Do not respond to questions
  9. Ignore your readers
  10. Do not treat visitors to your blog as guests
  11. Have no name to be called by
  12. Do not read other blogs
  13. Do not comment on other blogs
  14. Believe that blogging is going to make you rich
  15. Leave links with no relevance (usually to your own posts)…

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The Reason Shame is the Beating Heart of All Great Stories – written by Kristen Lamb

Kristen Lamb published a phenomenal blog post about her taste and the reason shame is the beating heart of all great stories. I admire her knowledge and her willingness to share it. Thank you, Kirsten!

 

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I read a ridiculous amount of novels and I’m very picky, namely because I have the attention span of a fruit fly with a crack habit. Like most modern readers, it takes a lot to grab then keep my attention.

Most books I end up putting down or returning to Audible for another. There are books I finish then forget. Most are meh. Good way to kill time not much more. But then there are the ones that stick, the stories I never grow tired of reading and rereading and recommending and as you can see, I have very eclectic taste.

Some of my fondest loves are Heart-Shaped Box, Big, Little Lies, American Gods, Prisoner of Hell Gate, The Joy Luck Club, Luckiest Girl Alive, the Harry Bosch series by Michael Connelly, The Lincoln Lawyer, and anything written by Fredik Backman Britt Marie Was Here being my favorite.

Yet what do all these great stories have in common? Why do they make me laugh and cry and cheer? What is so cathartic about these books?

 

To continue reading Kristen Lambs post, please go to her blog by clicking the link below:

http://authorkristenlamb.com/2017/07/the-reason-shame-is-the-beating-heart-of-all-great-stories/

 

The Truth Behind Popular Copyright Myths – written by Susan Spann

The Story Reading Ape made sure that I read this blog post, written by Susan Spann of “Writer Unboxed”. I found it informative, interesting and very helpful and couldn’t resist making sure that word is spread about this blog post. Thank you, Susan Spann!

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Copyright law can seem confusing, but authors need to know the basics—especially when (and whether) to register a copyright, and what to do when using a pseudonym. As a publishing lawyer, I work with copyright issues (and authors) all the time, and today, I thought I’d take a closer look at some popular myths about copyright law and how it applies to novels and other creative works.*

Myth #1: You have to register copyright in order to own the copyright in your work.

False. Registration with the U.S. Copyright Office is not a legal requirement for copyright ownership. Copyright attaches to “qualifying works**” automatically at the time of their creation. However, copyright registration is generally required in order to file a lawsuit against infringers, and to claim certain benefits under the U.S Copyright Act, so authors should register copyright within three months of a work’s initial publication.

(**Short stories, novellas, novels, anthologies, poetry, and similar fiction and non-fiction works all generally qualify for copyright protection.)

 Myth #2: Authors benefit from copyright registration.

 

To read the entire article, please go to:

http://writerunboxed.com/2017/06/26/the-truth-behind-popular-copyright-myths/