Not All Publishers are Equal

Steven Capps informs us with his article not all publishers are equal, which I think is an interesting and informative read, in particular for us ‘newbies’. Thanks Steven!

Steven Capps

I originally posted this in a Facebook group, but I liked the topic and wanted to expand on it here. If you’ve already seen it, I’m super sorry though like I said, I have added more content. Recently, I’ve had some writers asking whether a publisher is good or not. Ultimately, this decision is up to the writer looking to submit to them. We all have differing motivations and some simply just want to get published and nothing more while others want to make a career out of writing. This post is not going to talk about scam publishers (you can read my post about them here), but rather what seperates an okay publisher from a good publisher.

There are three requirements I look for when I am considering if a market is worthy of a submission. If they do not meet these then they are a waste of…

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How to Create a High-Performing Book Sales Page for Your Launch 

“howtoebook” has published a very interesting blog about how to create a high performing book sales page for your launch. You can see their guide on the link they provide within the blog post. Thank you!

How To Ebook

How to Create a High-Performing Book Sales Page for Your Launch

/2 days ago

Not so long ago, creating a landing page was a technologically challenging and time-consuming exercise. It was also outrageously expensive, which is not something an author on a shoestring budget wants to hear.

Fortunately, there are now multiple, cost-effective options for building a beautiful landing page with all of the dressing but none of the hassle. Simply follow our guide to create your own

http://bookmarketingtools.com/blog/how-to-create-a-high-performing-book-sales-page-for-your-launch/

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How To Set Up Twitter Ads For Your Books: A Complete Guide By Alfageek

Nicholas Rossis has published a blog post with a fantastic step-by-step guide on how to set up twitter ads for your books – a guide that has been created and built by alfageek, aka Joshua Smith. Thank you Joshua and Nicholas for providing us with this useful information.

Nicholas C. Rossis

Joshua Edward Smith | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksI’ve mentioned Joshua Smith’s (aka Alfageek’s) excellent blog in the past (in Alfageek Shares His Bookbub Ads Experience and The Benefits Of KDP Select: One Author’s Experience).

Well, the man has done it again and produced the best guide in setting up Twitter ads I’ve ever seen. He has detailed everything in six (!) consecutive posts aptly titled Step By Step Instructions for Promotion of your Book with Twitter Ads. I will be repeating here the gist of it in a single, easy-to-bookmark post with my experience added to Joshua’s, but be sure to check out the complete posts on his blog if you decide to go down the Twitter ads route.

How To Set Up Twitter Ads For Your Books

twitter tips | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Photo by thesocialskinny.com

Using Twitter Ads, Joshua has been able to sell an average of almost 3 copies of his first novel a day, day in…

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The Seven Deadly Sins of Prologues—What Doesn’t Work and What Does

Are Prologues bad? Read in Kristen Lamb’s blog what she recommends. It’s another great post she published! Thank you Kristen.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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We writers have a vast array of tools at our disposal to craft stories readers will love. But like any tool, it helps if we know how to use it properly. Theme is wonderful. It can keep us plunging a story’s depths for years when used correctly. Applied incorrectly? It just makes a story annoying and preachy.

Description! Love me some description! But pile on too much and we can render a story unreadable.

The same can be said of prologues. Now, before we get into this, I want to make it clear that certain genres lend themselves to prologues. But even then, we are wise to make sure the prologue is serving the story.

So, to prologue or not to prologue? That is the question.

The problem with the prologue is it has kind of gotten a bad rap over the years, especially with agents. They generally hate them…

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Failure, Betrayal & Setbacks—Sometimes the Only Way Out is THROUGH

Kristen Lamb, one of my all time favorite bloggers and writers informs us about Failure, Betrayal & Setbacks. Thank you very much Kristen.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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Setbacks. We all have them and, strangely, they like to cluster together and dog pile us at once. The trick to setbacks is to adjust our perspective of what happened and use them to to make us stronger, wiser and grittier.

You might not believe me, but instant success is not always good for us. There is something about the process of learning and doing and failing and starting again and again even when we want to give up that is healthy. In fact it is vital for any kind of long-term achievement.

I know because I’ve encountered my share of people who were promoted too soon, beyond the scope of their abilities and far past the strength of their character. And it ended badly every…single…time.

Growth is a Process

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All human growth is a process. It has steps. We skip steps at our own peril. Everything we are doing…

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A ‘HOW TO 101:’ Resource for you…

The Story Reading Ape has done us writers a HUGE favor. He has listed all 250 “How to…” blog post that appeared on his blog so far in one place which makes it easier to us to find them.
Thank you so much for this!!

how_to

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

There have been about 250 ‘HOW TO’ type posts appear on this blog to date, so I ‘ve compiled links to them in a

HOWTO 101:‘ page

See the tab above.

Then I realised that smartphone users can’t see the tab, or even the search facility top left of every post/page, so decided to draw attention to this resource, in a post.

So, without further ado, I introduce you to:

To see the list of topics included

Click HERE

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3 Tips On Describing Eyes In A Story

Author Nicholas Rossis provides us with 3 tips on describing eyes in a story. Thank you, Nicholas. This is very helpful!

Nicholas C. Rossis

NowNovel recently posted a great post on how to describe eyes in a story. As they point out, many beginning authors over-rely on eye color to create an impression of their characters, but this is merely a first step. Instead, you can follow these tips to create a memorable description:

1. Make a characters’ eyes a source of contrast

Drawing of a character's eye by Marigona Toma Drawing of an eye by Marigona Toma. Source: pinterest.com/pin/390124386447098306/

As any trip to the local coffee shop will tell you, people’s appearances are often full of contrasts. The man with the big, ruddy face might have small, delicate hands. The woman with the angelic face may have a trucker’s hoarse voice. And so on. One way to describe characters’ eyes effectively is to use them to create contrast.

This can be particularly effective if the contrast is used to highlight a character’s “third dimension” – ie what makes them non-stereotypical…

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