What every writer should know before writing a first novel – Written By Lisa Poisso

Your first time attempting anything you value is fraught with risk. Most authors I know tackle their first novels with little more than hopes and dreams under the hood. Under these conditions, writing eighty thousand words can seem like an impossible exercise, and publishing those words remains an inscrutable business best left to the rich, the famous, and the extremely lucky.

And yet people do it all the time. Should you?

Before you jump the gun and publish a premature effort, learn what many authors wish they’d known before they started writing that book in the first place.

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When A Self-Published Author Dies What Happens To Their Books? – Written By Derek Haines

on Just Publishing Advice:

It’s not a question you ask every day, but what happens when a self-published author dies?

For the family of an author, you may want to keep the books available for sale.

In some cases, it’s relatively easy if there is a publishing contract and the publisher is still in business.

But it is not so simple if the author was self-published.

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What’s a REAL Writer? Spotting Terminological Inexactitude Syndrome – Written By Kristen Lamb

Being a writer is the best job in the world, aside from those fortunate enough to be paid to pet kittens or sample new ice cream flavors. But is writing a REAL job? This question has set fire to the entire psychiatric community. Okay, most of them…the ones in my head *turns off fire alarms*.

Many in our modern culture don’t believe writing qualifies as a legitimate occupation. An unusual percentage of ‘average’ citizens firmly maintain that being a writer is NOT a real job. These same individuals, however, collectively spend billions of dollars and most of their free time enjoying entertainment (created by writers).

Cleaning Teeth= ‘Real’ Job

Writing= Goofing Off

Thus far, those interviewed have yet to note the irony of their assertions (or looked up definition of irony). Since being a writer is not a ‘real job,’ then this leads us to the next most reasonable conclusion. Writing, in truth, may be a mental condition. I have written about the 13 Ways Writers Are Mistaken for Serial Killers.

So there IS that…

Today is Friday, and since we all debated Sean Penn’s book in the comments section on my last post (Was he serious or poking fun at the establishment?), I figured this oldie but goodie was the perfect dash of humor to lead y’all into the weekend…

CONTINUE READING HERE

Why FBI Profilers Mistake Writers for Serial Killers – Written By Sue Coletta

You might be surprised by how many traits writers share with serial killers. FBI profilers have actually profiled a subject only to discover s/he’s not a killer. S/he’s a writer. Here’s why a profiler might mistake writers for serial killers.

We work alone.

Writers spend hours alone, plotting and planning the perfect demise. We let the fantasy build until we find an ideal murder method to fit our plot, and a spark ignites our creativity. We’re giddy with excitement and can’t wait to swan-dive into our story.

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How To Sell Your Book On Amazon [70 Book Marketing Tips] – Written By Dave Chesson

on Kindlepreneur:

You wrote a book, and now you want to sell it on Amazon. I’ve got good news! Kindlepreneur is coming in clutch with 70+ book marketing ideas that will help you sell more books on Amazon’s eBook and print book marketplace.

Also read Kindlepreneur’s Marketing Mastery Guide.

Let’s dive right in.

In this article, you will learn:

  1. 71 book marketing tips
  2. How to sell your book on Amazon
  3. All sorts of practical resources

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The 5 Most Common Mistakes in Book Cover Design and How to Avoid Them – Written By Clayton Noblit

on Written Word Media:

Book cover design has long been an important part of getting readers to pick up a text. Today readers are shopping for both physical and eBooks online. Book Cover Design is more important than ever.

Readers click through countless options and offers. A good cover can be the difference between a reader stopping to check out your description, or clicking on to the next page without stopping. Getting a reader’s attention with your cover is one of the first steps in getting someone to read your book.

Think about your book cover as an advertisement. It’s the most widely used piece of advertising creative you will have. And it’s important to invest in.

In this post, we’ll outline the five most common mistakes in book cover design and how to avoid them. These tips can help you whether you are creating your own cover with a program like Canva, or working with a designer. When you work with a cover designer, keep these tips in mind and make sure you give them creative direction that won’t force them to make the mistakes below.

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Speaking Without Freaking: A Writer’s Guide – Written By Ann Harth

on Fiction University:

Public speaking has been defined as the number one fear in Western society today. Number Two? Death. As one well-known comedian pointed out: This means that at a funeral you’d rather be in the coffin than giving the eulogy.

A writer writes, correct? But in the 21st century, a writer must also network, market and sell. This calls for some comfort in the public speaking arena. If you’re anything like I was when I started out, speaking in front of a group seemed less inviting than stapling my fingers together

Successful writers will probably have to speak in public at some point. Book signings, launches and author talks can all generate a portion of the income we need to support our writing habits.

Accepting these opportunities can make a huge difference to a writer’s career.

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How to Establish Yourself as a Freelance Writer – Written By Jori Hamilton

on Digital Pubbing:

So you’re considering the possibility of becoming a freelance writer, but you’re not really sure what steps you need to take to make it all happen. Sound about right?

Becoming a successful freelance writer is a bit of a whirlwind; nobody seems to fall cleanly into the career path. Instead, those who ultimately become successful will almost always tell you that there was no shortage of pure luck at hand. Every success story is different—someone may tell you they got their start with one blowout piece and the work has been rolling in ever since. More likely there were a lot of smaller pieces that paid a bit here and a bit there that ultimately went into building a strong reputation.

Regardless of how most people start, if you are serious about giving freelance writing a shot, there are a handful of things you can do to prepare yourself. Of course, there is no step-by-step guide to success, but having the basics figured out at the start can put you off on the right foot.

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7 Agents Seeking Nonfiction, Social Justice, Kidlit, Memoir, Literary Fiction and more – Written By Erica Verrillo

on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity:

Here are seven literary agents actively seeking clients.

Rebecca Eskildsen is actively growing her list, with a particular interest in middle grade, YA, and adult fiction. She is looking to elevate LGBTQ+ and BIPOC voices, among other underrepresented narratives.

Delia Berrigan Fakis is looking for nonfiction, as well as literary and commercial fiction, mysteries, and children’s picture books.

Alison Lewis represents a wide range of nonfiction and fiction, with a particular focus on journalism, narrative nonfiction, cultural criticism, history, science, literary fiction, memoir and essays.

Kathryn Willms is seeking History; Memoir; Sports; Business; Biography; Health and Wellness; Women’s Issues; Culture; Current Affairs; Journalism; Food and Drink; Self-improvement; Science; Film.

Sulamita Garbuz gravitates primarily towards nonfiction, with an emphasis on books with a social justice bent.

Nicole Eisenbraun is looking for middle grade and young adult fiction and nonfiction, in all genres.

Lisette Verhagen is seeking fiction and nonfiction, especially from immigrants and foreign language writers.

Always check the agency website and agent bio before submitting. Agents can switch agencies or close their lists, and submission requirements can change. 

NOTEDon’t submit to two agents at the same agency simultaneously. If one rejects you, you may then submit to another.

Get Full Details HERE

The Burning Desire: The Difference Between Magnificent & Maddening – Written By Kristen Lamb

Kristen Lamb once more provided us with an excellent educational post about writing. Thank you so much Kristen. You know we always appreciate your posts and you sharing experience and knowledge!


The burning desire is the beating heart of all great stories. Without the burning desire, the story will fall apart faster than a reality star who’s lost her hair extensions.

We’ve discussed story structure more times than I can count on this blog, and for good reasons. When we understand the fundamental parts of story and how they work, why they work, etc. THEN when something seems ‘off’ we possess the knowledge base and vocabulary to detect WHY the story isn’t working then fix it.

The Burning Desire for the BBT

the burning desire, great fiction, storytelling, fiction, Kristen Lamb, goal conflict motivation

I know it’s been a while, so super quick review. The first crucial ingredient for any story is a core antagonist to create the main problem in need of resolution by the time we reach THE END.

Since the whole ‘antagonist’ concept tied my brain in knots for YEARS, I finally invented my own term—Big Boss Troublemaker (BBT).

Why?

Because every story must have a core antagonist or, by definition, it isn’t a story.

That said, not all antagonists are villains. Villains are only one type of antagonist. Very useful in thrillers, horror, mystery, science fiction, and the like, but not so much in general fiction or literary fiction.

To understand more what I mean about the BBT, feel free to go HERE. If we fail to understand the BBT, then frankly the burning desire is a moot point.

While all stories must have a core antagonist (BBT), that alone isn’t enough. We must also figure out what drives the BBT. What is the burning desire fueling the goal that will eventually come at odds with the protagonist and (eventually) create a hero?

If we look back at some of the most iconic books, movies and series, we will see the writers NAILED the burning desire.

***I’ve detailed this on posts about real ‘flesh and blood’ villains, but also when we have a BBT that might be more everyday or existential.

Again, in the essence of time, I recommend taking a look at the posts I’ve hyperlinked.

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