Picking A Consort For A Council Member

The Council of Twelve Series has four published books so far.


Now, as compared to four published books, so far nine books in the series have been written. That means, there are not many Archangels without a consort anymore. 

But how do I pick the Archangel consorts? What skills, what powers, what strength do they need to become an Archangel consort? How do they have to look?

These questions are answered quite simply:

  1. There’s only one rule: there is no rule anyone knows about it, except the Archangel’s Creator and Father.
  2. See rule #1

We have Katie, an Angel, who became an Archangel consort. In book three there is a Demon Tracker, Zepheira, or Zye, as her friends call her, who, with her unusual looks and two ram-like horns became an Archangel consort, and obviously is the only woman in existence who can take the Fire-Angel’s unshielded heat. In book four, we have a Bounty Hunter, Simin Arnatt, who carries a big secret, is immortal, and an Archangel consort.

The Council of Twelve fights against the ‘other side’, fights evil, tries to protect humans from being taken over. The war ‘Good vs. Evil’ is omnipresent. The other side gains strength and power. The good side is keeping up with unexpected power…

But how are the consorts found? How do they become consorts?

Let me find an example for you.

Sundance’s story ends with a ‘cliffhanger’. The young warrior-angel finds herself in a dreadful situation. She needs help, support. What I needed was a strong, independent, almost stubborn woman, with wit, boldness, and courage. I needed an experienced woman with her own set of skills. That’s how Zepheira was created. I wanted her extraordinary, not only in character but her looks too. That’s why I gave her the horns. Of course, she’s beautiful. And her inner bravery and her physical appearance, including her height, gave me three Archangels to hook her up with. In Zepheira’s case, these were Tsechirel, Zachariel, and Uriel. I had another woman in mind for Tsechirel and excluded him from the contest. After some more thinking, I decided on Uriel. And don’t they make a wonderful couple?

Of course, the further the series progresses, the less available Archangels are left, and the harder it gets, to find a suitable consort. If anyone has an idea for a consort, please let us know in the comments.

There are more consorts to show up, more stories to tell, and more lonely Archangels.

Continue reading ‘The Council of Twelve’ series!

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Amazon Changing File Requirements for KDP Ebooks – Written By New Shelves

Many of you have recently received emails from Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) announcing that Amazon is changing file requirements for KDP ebooks. As often happens with change, there is some confusion about how this will change how authors and publishers will upload their ebooks to KDP leading to questions and concerns.

From https://kdp.amazon.com/en_US/help/topic/G200634390:

“After June 28, 2021, we will no longer support MOBI files when publishing new or updating previously published reflowable ebooks. Instead, use EPUB, DOCX or KPF formats, see our Frequently Asked Questions for more information. MOBI files are still accepted for fixed-layout ebooks.”

What Does That Mean, Exactly?

Continue reading HERE

6 Creative Ways to Name Your Fictional Characters – Written By Andre Clayton

Thank you, Andre Clayton for a great blog post about naming our fictional characters. We all have been there. And for all of us it’s always interesting to find out how other authors are doing it!


on The Write Life:

When you start writing your story, how long does it take you to come up with character names?

Choosing the perfect name for your protagonist and antagonist can take ages, especially when you’re not sure how to start.

I’ve been there. After wasting days staring at a blank computer screen, attempting to come up with names for all of my characters, I developed with some helpful naming strategies. And I’d like to share them with you!

Continue reading HERE

Top 15 Free Self-Publishing Companies For New Authors – Written By Derek Haines

on Just Publishing Advice:

If you are a new author, you have plenty of choices of free self-publishing companies to publish your book.

It is very easy to publish an ebook today and make it available to the world.

You can also publish a paperback book using print-on-demand services.

There’s nothing to stop you from publishing your new book, and yes, you can do it for free.

In This Article15 Free self-publishing companies, you can choose
.

The best choices for ebooks

.1. Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP)

2. Apple Books

3. Barnes & Noble Press

4. Kobo Writing Life

5. StreetLib

6. Xinxii

7. PublishDrive.


Ebook aggregators.

8. Draft2Digital

9. Smashwords.


Free paperback self-publishing

10. Amazon KDP

11. Blurb

12. IngramSpark

13. BookBaby

14. Lulu

15. Barnes & Noble Press.

Conclusion

Get Full Details HERE

Smorgasbord Laughter Lines – April 13th 2021 – Hosts Debby Gies and Sally Cronin – Selective Hearing and Writing Humour

Thank you so much for the giggles, Sally! I’m trying to spread the smiles. These are so funny!

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Welcome to laughter lines. We will be sharing some of our favourites from the archives over the next few weeks.

If you have not discovered the non-fiction books by D.G. Kaye:Amazon USAnd: Amazon UK Blog: D.G. WritesGoodreads: D.G. Kaye on Goodreads – Twitter: @pokercubster

Check out Debby’s column here on SmorgasbordD.G. Kaye Explores the Realms of Relationships 2020

Now something from Sally. Wry Writing Humour

A writer comes home to a burned down house. His sobbing and slightly-singed wife is standing outside. “What happened, honey?” the man asks.

“Oh, John, it was terrible,” she weeps. “I was cooking, the phone rang. It was your agent. Because I was on the phone, I didn’t notice the stove was on fire. It went up in second. Everything is gone. I nearly didn’t make it out of the house. Poor Fluffy is–”

“Wait…

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The Fault in Our Reviews – Written By Deborah Grant-Dudley

Deborah Grant-Dudley informs us about the review rules on Amazon. It is hard to get reviews on Amazon, particularly for us Indie Authors. Deborah tells us why. Thank you very much.


How to avoid having your book review deleted

Indie authors rely on book reviews to help sell their books. But Amazon are notoriously strict about reviews. They frequently decline new reviews and delete existing reviews. If you want to help an indie author, it’s important to stay in Amazon’s good books. Yes, I went there!

Here’s a handy guide to writing reviews that will be accepted. Be aware other bookstores have their own guidelines. I’ve focused on Amazon as they are the biggest bookseller, and they sell lots of indie books.

Image of scrabble squares spelling out the word rules.
Photo by Joshua Miranda on Pexels.com

Check you allowed to review the book

Amazon has a minimum spend threshold you must meet before you can leave a review. Currently, that’s £40 in the UK and $50 in the US. You must have spent at least that amount in the past 12 months. If you meet this criteria, you can review a book on their website.

CONTINUE READING HERE

Writing Rules vs. Writing Fashion: Should Writers Follow Fashion Trends? – Written by Anne R. Allen

Fashion. It sounds frivolous, but it has serious effects on us all.

Right now, women are getting beard-burn from kissing men who sport the fashionable romantic-hero three-day stubble. And mothers are stifling their disappointment when their golden-haired boys get the fashion-victim shaved-sides hairdo that makes them look like a cross between Kim Jong Un and the Last of the Mohicans.

And have pity on the people over 40 who are hunched over their computers trying to decipher text from the latest fashion in web design: a tiny, palest-gray font on a white background.

Alas, fashion favors the young.

Writing fashion is hard on us too. Fashion dictates a good deal of what gets published these days, and it’s constantly changing. Write like Thackery, Kipling, or Walter Scott and you’re unlikely to find a publisher or an audience. That’s because writing fashions have radically changed in the last two hundred years, even though the language itself has not.

The truth is that a great many of the “rules” that writers learn in workshops, critique groups, and classes are not actual rules of the English language. They may not even represent correct grammar. But they’re the “way we do things now.”

In other words:  They’re what’s in fashion.

Continue reading HERE

Change Matters: How to Write Stories that Grip Readers & Don’t Let Go – Written By Kristen Lamb

Thank you so much, Kristen Lamb, for another educational blog post on how to write stories properly and keep the reader interested. We all appreciate your hard work!


Change is one of those concepts that gets a mixed reaction. Depending on personality and/or age group, change could be welcomed…or greeted with a metaphorical shotgun at the metaphorical door. While change is necessary for all living things to grow and thrive, plants have proven far more open to this notion than people.

I’m betting it’s because plants don’t overthink everything…unless they’re orchids which are high-maintenance and die while writing bad haiku (if they had hands and pen and paper).

Existential plants have a far tougher time, unlike weeds. Weeds just roll with anything that comes their way, and that’s why we can pour concrete over them and it’s no big deal. They simply mumble to the nearby crabgrass, “Hold my beer and watch this!”

*makes crack in new driveway* I’M BAAAAAACK!

All kidding aside, many writers miss the point of a story. Stories are about change, and the more the protagonist (and, to be blunt, all members of the cast) change for good or bad, the better.

Change & Plot

I know what it’s like to have writer brain. We see the world VERY differently than ‘normal’ people. Some see a roll of old carpet at the curb? I’m counting if all family members are present. Just yesterday, I had some fun over on Facebook with this…

CONTINUE READING HERE

Three Red Flags – Warnings From ‘Writer Beware’ Blog – Written By Victoria Strauss

The last three notifications from the ‘Writer Beware’ blog, by Victoria Strauss, left me shaken, like so many others she provided us with. I normally try to spread word about scam, fraud, and other warnings as good as I can, but I refuse to drown ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest’ readers in negativity.

However, I think, it’s important that, in particular new Indie Authors know what dangers they might face when putting their books and their work ‘out there’. I therefore decided to publish one post with links to all three of Victoria Strauss’ warnings. Thank you for your great work, Victoria!


SCAMMERS TAKING BIG 5 PUBLISHERS’ NAMES IN VAIN: A GROWING TREND

I’ve been doing the Writer Beware thing for quite some time, and I Have Seen Some Shit. 
But this solicitation from a Philippines-based publishing and marketing scammer calling itself Right Choice Multimedia (among other names) is one of the most disgusting things that has come across my desk in a while…and that’s saying something. 


Here it is in its entirety. Read it and boggle. You can also scroll down directly to my (far more grammatical) debunking. Be sure to read all the way to the end, because I have some things to say about why Big 5 publishers should care that their trademarks and reputations are being co-opted in this way.

Continue Reading Here


CONTRACT RED FLAG: WHEN A PUBLISHER CLAIMS COPYRIGHT ON EDITS

This is an updated version of a post I published a couple of years ago.

It’s not all that common, but I do see it from time to time in small press publishing contracts that I review: a publisher claiming ownership of the editing and copy editing it provides, or making the claim implicitly by reverting rights only to the original manuscript submitted by the author.

Are there legal grounds for such a claim? One would think that by printing a copyright notice inside a published book, and encouraging the author to register copyright or registering on the author’s behalf, publishers are acknowledging that there is not. It’s hard to know, though, because the issue doesn’t seem to have been tested in the courts. There’s not even much discussion. 

Continue Reading Here


SCAM ALERT: PAPER BYTES MARKETING SOLUTIONS, BLUEPRINT PRESS, AND THEIR STABLE OF IMAGINARY LITERARY AGENTS

Once upon a time, there was a publishing and marketing scammer called Chapters Media and Advertising, owned by one Mark Joseph Rosario. Chapters pretended to be a US company–it even had dual business registrations in Wyoming and Florida, as well as a purported address in Nevada–but in reality, it operated out of the Philippines (much like its many brethren).


Chapters was an unusually devious little scammer. In addition to offering the usual substandard publishing services and junk marketing ripoffs, it had a sideline in impersonating literary professionals, including agent Jennifer Jackson of the Donald Maass Agency and literary scout Clare Richardson of Maria B. Campbell Associates. I’ve written about both of these impersonation scams (as well as the issue more generally; Chapters was not the only one doing this).

Continue Reading Here

WELCOME TO DAY 2 OF #RRBC’S ’20 WC&BE SPONSORS BLOG TOUR! @RRBC_ORG @RRBC_RWISA @TWEETS4RWISA @KIRAZIAN

Good morning, Readers,

It’s my pleasure to feature today, author Liza Kirazian. Lisa is a very supportive member of the Rave Reviews Book Club. Please be sure to leave a comment below to ensure that you have a chance at winning a $20 Amazon Gift Card!

Appassionato (The Music We Made—Book 2)

Appassionato, Book Two of “The Music We Made” series, continues the passionate story of the next generation of the Driscoll family of musicians as Jenny Driscoll, a composer and conductor, navigates her personal and professional life in London in the 1990’s.

CONTINUE READING HERE