Soul Taker Secrets – Angel Wings

The Council of Twelve series is a YA fantasy/paranormal romance series where we meet celestial beings. The first book in the series is ‘Soul Taker’, where we meet the Council of Twelve, the most powerful individuals in existence, and the protagonist, Katie, a Guardian Angel-to-be. In the ‘Soul Taker Secrets’ category, I reveal the one or other ‘inside’ knowledge about The Council of Twelve, their consorts, and in this case, a little of their physical secrets.


Picture courtesy of https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/feathers-article/

Wing feathers

The wing feathers specialized for flight are characterized by uniform windproof surfaces, or vanes, on either side of the central shaft that is created by an interlocking microstructure. Also called remiges, these feathers are asymmetric with a shorter, less flexible leading edge that prevents mid-air twisting.

Amazon Parrot wing feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Tail feathers

Most tail feathers, or rectrices, feature an interlocking microstructure similar to wing feathers. Arranged in a fan shape, these feathers support precision steering in flight. Typically, birds have six pairs of feathers on the tail, which display increasing levels of asymmetry toward the outer pairs. In some birds, tail feathers have evolved into showy ornaments that are useless in flight.

Ruffed Grouse tail feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Contour feathers

Contour feathers are what you see covering the bird’s body and streamlining its shape. Arranged in an overlapping pattern like shingles, the waterproof tips are exposed to the elements, and the fluffy bases are tucked close to the body. Sometimes brilliantly colored or uniformly drab, contour feathers can also help the bird show off or stay camouflaged. Contour feathers on the wing, called coverts, shape it into an efficient airfoil by smoothing over the region where the flight feathers attached to the bone.

Helmeted Guineafowl contour feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Semiplume

Mostly hidden beneath other feathers on the body, semiplumes have a developed central rachis but no hooks on the barbules, creating a fluffy insulating structure.

Northern Cardinal semiplume feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Down

Similar to semiplumes with an even looser branching structure but little or no central rachis, down feathers, are relatively short and positioned closest to the body where they trap body heat.

Canada Goose down feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Filoplume

Short, simple feathers with few barbs, filoplumes function like mammal whiskers to sense the position of the contour feathers.

Common Poorwill filoplume feather illustration by Andrew Leach

Bristle

Bristles are the simplest feathers, with a stiff rachis that usually lacks barb branches. Most commonly found on the head, bristles may protect the bird’s eyes and face.

Domestic Chicken bristle feather illustration by Andrew Leach

(Source: https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/feathers-article/)


Now that we learned about the different feathers in the wings let’s look at the different wing-shapes.

Picture courtesy of https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/

In this picture, we can see the wing shaping feathers and their functionality.


Now, bird and angel wings basically have the same biological structure with one main difference. Their mobility is far more extended to guarantee the optimal function since, of course, angels don’t have tail feathers to brake, steer, and keep the balance of the wing carrier. And of course, they are much more reliable, due to the weight they have to lift.

Picture courtesy of Freepik.com

Too late for this year but perhaps next…? A competition for self-published authors – Written By Bridget Whelan

Bridget Wheelan informs us about a competition for self-published authors. Unfortunately for this year it’s already too late, but maybe next? Thank you, Bridget!

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August 31st is the deadline for the Kindle Storyteller Award which Amazon celebrates the best self-published story in the UK with a £20,000 cash prize.

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

 

I know that is still a month away, but you have to do an awful lot of work to make sure your story qualifies and readers are a crucial part in helping to choose the shortlist. Customer feedback is based on such factors as quality of reviews, sales and pages read in Kindle Unlimited. I underlined the word quality because Amazon seem to be flagging up that 50 ‘It’s really great‘ reviews won’t cut it. What you really need is quality AND quantity.

To qualify you need to publish on KDP, Amazon’s publishing arm in both eBook and paperback versions. The paperback version of your book must be at least 24 pages long and the qualifying period for…

CONTINUE READING HERE

How To Republish A Book For Self-Published Authors – Written By Derek Haines

Derek Haines informs us in his article about how to republish a book for self-published authors. Thank you so very much for all your hard work, Derek!

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on Just Publishing Advice:

Can a self-published book be republished?

Yes, if you have self-published a book, you can update it at any time and as often as you like.

You can change, modify, merge, or improve your book for both ebook and print versions.

You can update the cover design, change your genre and category listings and fine-tune, or find new keyword listings.

In This Article

How to republish a book
The big advantage of self-publishing
It’s always possible to improve a book
Add images
Add links to an ebook
Check your formatting
Choose better categories and keywords
There is always room for improvement
Unpublish and republish
Summary

Continue reading HERE

How to show the emotions of non-viewpoint characters – Written By Louise Harnby

Louise Harnby published a fascinating article about the emotions of non-viewpoint characters and how to show them without screwing up. Thank you, Louise!

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Non-viewpoint characters have emotions too.

But how do we show them without head-hopping?

The answer lies in mastering observable behaviour.

Continue reading HERE

 

The Binge-Worthy Book Festival Week 1! – Written By Charles Yallowitz

Charles Yallowitz, owner of ‘The Legends of Windemere’ blog, informs us about ‘The Binge-Worthy Book Festival. Thank you, Charles!

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As I mentioned on my Saturday post, N.N. Light is hosting a Binge-Worthy Book Festival through the month of August.  Every weekday will have a new set of authors.  Legends of Windemere: Beginning of a Hero is on for today alongside others of various genres.  It’s a great selection, so I recommend checking it every day.  There are contests you can enter as well.

Click here for the  Festival!

Clicker here for the Rafflecopter!

CONTINUE READING HERE

5 Ways A Timeline Helps You Write Your Novel – Written By M. L. Davis

M. L. Davis provides us with an excellent article about how a timeline helps us write our novel. We can find the post published on the ‘Uninspired Writers’ blog. Thank you, M. L. Davis

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Some writers are plotters. Others are pantsers. There’s no right way to do it. There are pros and cons to plotting, and it’s up to you to decide what works best. Personally, I’m a plotter. Typically, my plotting consists of a basic outline and little else. It worked for two novels. But on my third, I was struggling. I spent ages trying to figure out why my story wouldn’t work before it hit me. I’d not sussed out the timeline, not properly. And once I had, it changed everything. As such, I’m sharing 5 ways that a timeline helps you write your novel.

Figuring out backstory
Not all backstory needs to be written. I would even go as far as to say most backstory doesn’t need to be written. But as a writer, it’s helpful to know where things started for your characters. It’s important to know what happened before the events of the first chapter. This way, you know what to include and what to omit. It also enables you to add depth to your characters, as undoubtedly their past has shaped them.
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Avoiding plot holes
A number of things can cause plot holes, and time is definitely one of them. If your characters and their story are to be believable, then time must move in the way it should. Even if your fictional world has it’s own concept of time, you should adhere to the rules you set for it. Savvy readers are likely to pick up on things that don’t flow naturally.

CONTINUE READING HERE

Blogger’s Books: Darlene Foster – On BeetleyPete’s Blog

On BeetleyPete’s blog we can find the introduction of a very familiar and beloved writer: Darlene Foster.

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It is my pleasure to feature a book from Canadian writer and blogger, Darlene.

This is the latest in her very popular ‘Amanda’ series. This time, our heroine is in Holland.

Here is Darlene’s bio.

Darlene Foster is a Canadian author who has written the popular Amanda Travels series, featuring a spunky twelve-year-old who loves to travel to unique places where she encounters mystery and adventure while learning about another culture. Readers of all ages enjoy travelling with Amanda as she unravels one mystery after another in various countries. Darlene has won prizes for her short stories and a number of them have been published in anthologies. She has also written a bi-lingual book for English/Spanish readers.

Darlene grew up on a ranch near Medicine Hat, Alberta, where her love of reading inspired her to travel the world and write stories. Over the years she held wonderful jobs such as an employment counsellor, ESL teacher, recruiter, and retail manager, and wrote whenever she had a few spare minutes. She is now retired and has a home in Spain where she writes full time. When not travelling, meeting interesting people, and collecting ideas for her books, she likes to spend time with her husband and entertaining dog, Dot.

Her books include: Amanda in Arabia: The Perfume Flask, Amanda in Spain: The Girl in The Painting, Amanda in England: The Missing Novel, Amanda in Alberta: The Writing on the Stone, Amanda on The Danube: The Sounds of Music, Amanda in New Mexico: Ghosts in the Wind, and Amanda in Holland: Missing in Action. Amanda in Malta: The Sleeping Lady will be released in the spring of 2021.

CONTINUE READING HERE