Let’s Get Real—Authenticity in Fiction – written by Kristen Lamb

Kristen Lamb published a fantastic blog post about authenticity in fiction, about our protagonists and how not to do it. Thank you very much for this informative and interesting article!

___________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Years ago when I got the idea to write a novel, I did what a lot of new writers do and created the uber perfect protagonist. In fact, when I came up with the original plot idea for The Devil’s Dance, I cast a Sarah Conner badass…and she was dull as dirt and utterly unlikable.

Yay me.

Bizarrely, when those critiquing didn’t like my protagonist, I made her more perfect thinking that would fix it. Um, no. Made it worse. They went from disliking her to kinda wanting to stab her in the face.
Why did I do this? Why did I default to super perfect?

Fear.

Fear of being authentic. I had no concept of what it was like to be perfect. My family resembled Season Two of the Jerry Springer Show. After my parents divorced, my dad disappeared for years only to resurface and take a job as a cashier at Stop-N-Go so he could get out of paying the originally allotted child support. I was never #1 at anything (unless one counts truancy). Terrible…

 

To continue reading the entire post go to:

http://authorkristenlamb.com/2017/06/lets-get-real-authenticity-in-fiction/#respond

A Simple Guide to Book Advances and Royalties

A Writer’s Path’ Ryan Lance has written a very informative and simple guide to book advances and royalties. Thank you very much!

A Writer's Path

by Gary Smailes

When a book publisher offers a book deal to a new author, the contract will talk about ‘advances’ and ‘royalties’. These can be a little confusing to new authors, though a little bit of knowledge will go a long way to helping you fully understand what you are being offered.

In this article, you will learn about royalties and advances, you will discover what is usual for a book publisher to offer and you will find out how the publishing world is changing the way it provides advances and royalties.

View original post 1,164 more words

More Indie Publishing Tips

Don Massenzio is not only a great author; he’s an excellent advisor too! Thank you, for your very helpful and informative tips on indie publishing, Don!

Don Massenzio's Blog

TandEFor me, indie publishing has consisted of a lot of trial-and-error to determine what things work and what things do not. Unlike other types of sales and marketing, as an author it is not only about selling books, but, to some degree, you are selling yourself. This is something I’m extremely uncomfortable with, but I’ve found some ways to adjust my approach to make it more tolerable.

This list consists of some of the things I’ve tried that have worked for me. Your mileage may vary.

Hard sell concept.

  • Blatantly asking people to buy your books doesn’t work. Instead, I’ve tried to use my blog, Facebook, and other social media to try to convince people that my work might be worth checking out. I do this by trying to entertain or teach with the material I post.

wordofmouth

  • Word of mouth is extremely important. Your existing readers are your best salespeople. I like interacting with them…

View original post 426 more words

I’m Having a Love Affair With ‘Had’!

Jan R. provides us with an amazing post about a ‘love affair with “had”‘. Thank you very much!

Writing your first novel-Things you should know

aid174983-v4-728px-Stop-Saying-the-Word-_Like_-Step-4-Version-2On more than one occasion I have declared my love affair with the word ‘had’. When you use a word so many times it jumps off the page, you have a problem. It doesn’t matter if the word is used correctly or not. You need to find another way to write the sentence without using ‘the word’. In my case that word is ‘had’.

What’s wrong with using the word ‘had’ over and over, besides making it an awkward read?

  • If you are using ‘had’ a lot, odds are you have a lot of backstory/info dump, because it specifically details things that happened before the current action. In some circumstances, that can seem dull, or like the focus is in the wrong place. Why spend so much time on something that’s not happening right now?
  • Using ‘had’ too much can also indicate you are telling vs. showing.
  • ‘Had’ is also rather formal…

View original post 294 more words

Shame, Shame, We Know Your Name—Or Do We? Shame & Fiction – by Kristen Lamb

Kristen Lamb provides us with an excellent blog post about Shame & Fiction. Thank you very much Kristen for sharing your knowledge with us.

 

************************************************************************************************************

Picture courtesy of Kristen Lamb’s blog post

 

Recently, I wrote a guest post This is the Reason All Great Stories are Birthed from Shame. It was a tough post and I needed a nap after writing it. It forced me to peel back layers I hadn’t touched in years. But the post got me thinking about probably the single most important element of great fiction
SHAME.
Since that post was not per se a craft post, I wanted to explore what I began on that blog here today. I firmly believe shame is the critical ingredient for fiction to resonate. It’s the difference between a forgettable fun read and a book we keep and read over and over.

 

Some Examples

I dig examples. I learn better when I have some to work with, so sharing some goodies with you today.

 

To continue reading go to the Original Blog post!

 

 

Oops! Hold on. You’re Newbie is Showing. – Blog Post by Kristen Lamb

Kristen Lamb published an excellent article about how to ‘recognize’ Newbies’. I have to admit, it took me a moment to realize I still do the one or other thing and need to work on that. I’m sure you will like that post as much as I do and might still learn something.

________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Get it? You’re newbie is showing? Ah we are talking about the deeper stuff today 😀 .

Writing seems like it just shouldn’t be that hard, and yet? It’s deceptive. Seasoned storytellers make it look easy, and that does us no favors. Sort of like when I was four years old and, high off an episode of Wonder Woman, went flying out the back door and got the bright idea to do a handspring just like–OH SWEET EIGHT POUND SIX OUNCE BABY JESUS THAT HURT.

Many of us who eventually decide to become novelists did so because we grew up loving books. Then, probably just as many of us, thought we could also do that seamless triple front handspring (write a full length novel) with zero professional training, no practice and no falls.

Yeah about that.

 

To continue reading the post, click here: http://authorkristenlamb.com/2017/04/oops-hold-on-youre-newbie-is-showing/