Your content is being archived

Wow, this is quite interesting. Who would have known? Thanks for sharing this, K. Morris!

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Did you know that your site (well a snapshot of it’s contents) may well be preserved for posterity?

This remains the case even if you decide to delete your blog and/or website.

Anyone interested in exploring what information is held about their site can visit https://archive.org/ and search for archived material pertaining to their blog.

https://archive.org/is not a substitute for backing up your website (it only collects snapshots of a website’s contents).

It does, however offer a fascinating glimpse into sites, many of which are no longer operative.

WHAT YOU WILL SEE:

SELECT and CLICK the WEB icon

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Type in YOUR FULL URL

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See the period covered

SELECT and CLICK ANY YEAR

SELECT and CLICK ANY BLUE CIRCLED DATE

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SEE the post imaged

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3 Tips On Describing Eyes In A Story

Author Nicholas Rossis provides us with 3 tips on describing eyes in a story. Thank you, Nicholas. This is very helpful!

Nicholas C. Rossis

NowNovel recently posted a great post on how to describe eyes in a story. As they point out, many beginning authors over-rely on eye color to create an impression of their characters, but this is merely a first step. Instead, you can follow these tips to create a memorable description:

1. Make a characters’ eyes a source of contrast

Drawing of a character's eye by Marigona Toma Drawing of an eye by Marigona Toma. Source: pinterest.com/pin/390124386447098306/

As any trip to the local coffee shop will tell you, people’s appearances are often full of contrasts. The man with the big, ruddy face might have small, delicate hands. The woman with the angelic face may have a trucker’s hoarse voice. And so on. One way to describe characters’ eyes effectively is to use them to create contrast.

This can be particularly effective if the contrast is used to highlight a character’s “third dimension” – ie what makes them non-stereotypical…

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It’s a jungle out there – watch out for the vanity presses #wwwblogs #amwriting #selfpublishing

Read this very important post, written by Alison Williams on vanity presses.

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Alison Williams Writing

I had a phone call the other day from an elderly gentleman who was trying to find an agent. I explained the process to him and then he said that he’d already published a book, but he still couldn’t get an agent. Digging deeper, it seemed that he was under the impression that if he had a book out on Amazon, an agent would come calling.

He’s published with a small press. I took a look on Amazon. His book has been out for almost three years. The blurb and the cover are terrible. He has zero sales and zero reviews. Getting a little bit cross now, I decided to dig a bit further.

It turns out that he paid money to a vanity press that seems to masquerade as a publisher. This organisation states on their website that they open to submissions. They give the impression that they are…

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Smorgasbord – Time for some Laffs – Out of the mouths of babes!

Thanks so much for sharing this wonderful humorous post with us. 🙂

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

laffsMy thanks to my lovely friend Mrs. T who sent the following laffs to me… I have embellished with some funnies from Facebook in recent months.

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A little girl was talking to her teacher about whales. The teacher said it was physically impossible for a whale to swallow a human, because even though it was a very large mammal, its throat was very small. The little girl stated that Jonah was swallowed by a whale. Irritated, the teacher reiterated that a whale could not swallow a human; it was physically impossible.

Little girl: ‘When I get to heaven I will ask Jonah.’

Teacher: ‘What if Jonah went to hell?’

Little girl: ‘Then you ask him.’

1533862_10151907730223030_1716352393_nA Kindergarten teacher was observing her classroom of children while they were drawing. She occasionally would walk around to see each child’s work. As she got to one little girl who was working diligently, she…

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How to SELL Your Book—First, What IS It?

One of my favorite writers, bloggers, teachers and amazing human being, Kristen Lamb, has published a blog post on “How to sell your book” – and how to find out what it is.

Additionally, don’t miss: W.A.N.A. offers a new class “How to Maximize Your Earning Potential as a Full-Time Author Learn from Hollywood Producer Joel Eisenberg”

Isn’t this phenomenal? Check it out. Thank you so much, Kristen!

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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Before we get started, a quick announcement. I want to let you know that I begged, pleaded and bartered for Hollywood Producer Joel Eisenberg to offer a Master’s Series and being the AWESOME human being he is, he is doing How to Maximize Your Earning Potential as a Full-Time Writer just for us. This is three two-hour classes learning from a big name in Hollywood in your own home and it is recorded if you can’t make it live. He normally runs this series for $399, but he is super helpful and generous and giving it to us for $199.

The film industry is BOOMING and filmmakers need writers who can create excellent content. Joel is going to teach you how to tap into that massive emerging market.

Valentines Day gift. *wink wink* Just sayin’.

Okay, let’s sally forth…

One of the reasons I love blogging is I get an…

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A Little Hook

Read this informative and interesting blog post, written by Jo Robinson on ‘first chapters’ and writing process. Thank you Jo!

Writing

Lit World Interviews

Every writer has his or her own process. Ideas come, sometimes in the form of virtual Mack trucks that appear out of nowhere, usually at the most inopportune of times, creating the need for you to stop whatever it is that you’re doing and run away to write all that good stuff down before it disappears back to wherever it was that it came from. Kind of thing that gets us scribblers labeled as odd, at the very least. The inspiration for new stories is the easy part of writing—I have PILES of fabulous story outlines that are unlikely to ever see the light of day. Getting them going is what’s needed for them ever to become real books. Just those few first paragraphs are often all that we need to give us the push to write on through to the end.

Those first paragraphs are probably the most important…

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