The Power Of Your Nose – Writing Improvement

Writers (and other humans) tend to suffer from insomnia, fatigue, depression, headaches, digestion problems, anxieties and other ailments, due to sitting too long, constant overflowing of their brain and thinking, and for other reasons, basically too many to count.

However, there is a possibility to help with some of these ailments in a natural healing way. My experience showed me some improvement in my general well-being, which helped me to better writing as well. I’m talking about essential oils. We breathe, and the smell of some essential oils help us with some of our ailments.

We just need to remember: Too much of a good thing can be bad.

Let’s have a look at what I found:

CITRUS

These light oils often have fruity scents that are characteristic of the rinds from which they are extracted. They can be described as tangy or tart, fresh, clean, vibrant, invigorating, exciting, energizing, and uplifting.

Lemon

Orange

Grapefruit Bergamot

Lime

Tangerine

Citronella

Lemongrass

Mandarin

Litsea Cubeba

Tagetes

Most often top notes

  • Energizing
  • Uplifting
  • Emotionally balancing to reduce feelings of stress and anxiety
  • Deodorizing
  • Cleansing; popular addition to antibacterial oil blends
  • Refreshing
  • Stimulating for mental and spiritual vigor

FLORAL

These scents are often reminiscent of the flowers from which they are extracted and can be described as being feminine, powdery, subtle, modest, romantic, and even poetic. They are often sweet-smelling and create a feeling of cheerfulness. Floral scents are considered to be classic and timeless.

Chamomile

Geranium

Jasmine

Lavender

Neroli

Rose

Rosewood

Ylang-Ylang

Petitgrain

Most often middle notes

  • Comforting
  • Promotes rest
  • Sometimes sleep-inducing
  • Mood balancing

HERBACEOUS

Essential Oils that have herbaceous scents can be further described as smelling green or grassy. These Essential Oils often have mild floral yet invigorating spring-like scents that are associated with lush, wet foliage. They are reminiscent of the aroma of fresh leaves, moss, mown grass, herbs, and trees.

Chamomile

Angelica Root

Clary Sage

Eucalyptus Radiata

Fennel

Hyssop

Marjoram 

Melissa

Rosemary

Thyme

Oregano

Bay Laurel

Catnip

Sage Dalmatian

Parsley

Tea Tree

Yarrow

Most often middle notes

  • Calming
  • Promotes positivity
  • Encouraging
  • Emotionally balancing
  • Grounding

CAMPHORACEOUS

These Essential Oils have strong scents and are known to be beneficial for clearing the respiratory system due to their clarifying, penetrating, energizing, purifying, and almost medicinal aromas.

Camphor

Cajeput

Eucalyptus

Pennyroyal

Laurel Leaf

Lavandin

Most often middle notes

  • Stimulating
  • Refreshing
  • Focus-enhancing

MINTY

Essential Oils with a minty scent are strong-scented and are distinctly known for their bracing, fresh fragrances. They are reputed to be clearing and cooling when used in aromatherapy and topical applications.

Spearmint

Wintergreen

Peppermint

Can be top, middle, or base Notes

  • Motivating
  • Cooling
  • Invigorating
  • Mentally clarifying

SPICY

These Essential Oils have exotic, warm, intense aromas that are often reminiscent of baking and other warm memories. With strong scents, they are commonly used to stimulate energy and focus.

Aniseed

Basil

Black Pepper

Cardamom

Cinnamon

Coriander

Cumin

Ginger

Nutmeg

Allspice

Cassia

Clove Bud

Middle or base notes

  • Bracing
  • Rousing
  • Crisp and penetrating
  • Lively

RESINOUS/MUSKY

These Essential Oils exude deep, rich scents that are smoky, woody, earthy, sweet, leather-like, and warm. Their mellow, alluring, and long-lasting fragrances lend a reassuring quality that makes them ideal for use in spiritual practices.

Benzoin 

Elemi

Frankincense

Myrrh

Peru Balsam

Middle or base notes

  • Grounding  
  • Promotes relaxation and sense of inner calm
  • Emotionally balancing
  • Uplifting
  • Known to be commonly used for intimacy enhancement
  • Tend to be associated with a casual feeling

WOODY/EARTHY

These Essential Oils have deep, warm, lingering scents.

Often described as smelling “brown,” these oils are reminiscent of the scents of a forest floor or damp soil. Their fragrances are soft, masculine, musky, and sensual. Their alluring, seductive, and hypnotic qualities create an atmosphere of mystery.

Cypress

Juniper Berry

Pine

Sandalwood

Fir

Cedarwood

(Atlas & Virginian)

Palo Santo

Rosewood

Patchouli

Vetiver

Valerian

Carrot Seed

Most often middle or base notes

  • Grounding
  • Uplifting
  • Emotionally balancing  
  • Promote feelings of comfort, security, and well-being
  • Often considered to be aphrodisiacs

I copied the above mentioned information from a website I consider an excellent source for beginners.

https://www.newdirectionsaromatics.com/blog/products/categories-of-essential-oils-their-benefits.html

But please, read about how to use them, the disclaimer, and the side effects. Essential oils are a wonderful addition to our life and can help us, not only with our writing, but they shouldn’t be used thoughtlessly or without limits.

Picture courtesy of https://health.clevelandclinic.org/essential-oils-101-do-they-work-how-do-you-use-them/

Marius – Written By KJ Magical Designs

KJ Magical Designs published another pre-made cover which I think is irresistible. Please contact KJ Magical Designs if you love the cover and would like to buy it for one of your books.

They can adjust the cover as you need it, just let them know your wishes.

 

CONTINUE TO THE KJ MAGICAL DESIGN WEBSITE 

May & June 2019 Writing Submissions [Writing Contests] – Written By Rachel Poli

Rachel Poli provides us with the May/June 2019 writing contests. Thank you very much for all your efforts to keep us updated, Rachel.


Here is the updated list for May & June 2019 writing submissions. I try to find submissions and contests with no fee (or on the cheaper side at least), which is surprisingly hard. As always, if you know any places that run contests and accept general submissions that are not on my list, please let me know and I’ll check it out to add it.

May 2019

Genre: Fiction, Poetry (list of categories are on website)
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: May 6, 2019 (early-bird deadline)
Entry Fee: $20 for Poetry, $30 for manuscript
Prize: Grand – $5,000

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: Forgiveness
Website: Chicken Soup
Deadline: May 30, 2019
Entry Fee: N/A
Prize: $200

June 2019

Genre: Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry
Website: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: June 3, 2019
Entry Fee: $25 for Poetry, $35 for Manuscript
Prize: Grand – $5,000

Read the entire blog post here

 

New Platform Connects Self-Published Authors With Readers – Written By Elaine Pofeldt

On the FORBES.com site Elaine Pofeldt writes an article about a new platform which connects self-published authors with readers. Thank you very much for this information Elaine!


It’s not easy to promote a book, and for self-published authors on a tight budget, it can be especially challenging.

Reedsy —a U.K.-based publishing startup that connects authors with editors, designers and marketers who can help them with their projects—has announced a new service to help them called Reedsy Discovery. Reedsy Discovery, which launched today, will let readers know about books its expert reviewers have recommended every week. Those who join are able to look through curated “bookshelves,” preview chapters and connect with other readers. Reedsy Discovery will also issue a weekly newsletter of top books in popular genres and books curated by trusted reviewers. It will also offer a leaderboard where readers can vote on their favorite titles.

“Most titles never get visibility,” says Reedsy CEO and Co-founder Emmanuel Nataf, who says the reasons often stem from a lack of knowledge of book promotion or reluctance to market their work. “We worked on a platform that will help authors find their target market,” he says.

To read the entire article go to:

New Platform Connects Self-Published Authors With Readers

My Personal Top Ten Blogs For Non-Fiction


 

Lately, I had not much to do and was thinking about the blogs I follow. From A through Z there are blogs of fiction authors (yes, the one or other has written a book, based on a true story, of course!), but I don’t deny I prefer reading fiction.

There are several reasons for that. For once: there’s plenty of horrors, cruelness, blood, killing, and death around. I prefer reading about all this where I can be sure it never had happened.

And second: I’m an empath, reading true, sad and horrible stories make me cry like a puppy and getting nightmares occasionally.

Occasionally I like reading history and biographies. (Provided they’re not biographies of bloodsoaked dictators who should have died in jail in Den Haag… but that’s a story for another time.

While I’ve been thinking about non-fiction books I had to admit non-fiction writers don’t get plenty of attention from me – and definitely not enough recognition!

I spent days to research blogs that are written by non-fiction writers or dedicated to non-fiction books.

To me, the following are the best of the ones I found:

https://brevity.wordpress.com/

https://nonfictionauthorsassociation.com/category/blog/

https://www.biographyonline.net/blog.html/

https://www.sarahsbookshelves.com/announcing-nonfiction-november-2018/

https://www.writermag.com/blog/interesting-nonfiction-books-fall-2018/

http://asuen.com/nonfictionmonday/

https://www.esquire.com/entertainment/books/g19404777/best-nonfiction-books-2018/

https://www.bustle.com/p/10-nonfiction-books-about-other-books-because-the-history-of-literature-is-fascinating-10239943

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/books/non-fiction/

http://bookbloggerlist.com/category/non-fiction/non-fiction-biographies-memoirs/

 

I have to say I need to give non-fiction authors more credit than I did until now. Their work is as hard as ours and I wouldn’t want to go through all the research, the fact-checking and everything they have to come up with to make their book a success.

Let’s say they’re experts on something, or someone and write a book about it, one tiny mistake can ruin them forever. My respect, therefore, is extremely high!

Are you a non-fiction writer? Do you know a non-fiction writer? Let us hear about your/their writing process and how it is to work with facts more than relying on fantasy. Let us know. We’re curious.

A.J.’s Newsletter Trouble-2

A few days ago I posted this really embarrassing article about my newsletter and how I wish more people would subscribe – without realizing, that of three possibilities to subscribe, only two worked.

 

Of course, the one that didn’t work was the one here on ‘Writer’s Treasure Chest,’ where most people would have the chance to subscribe.

It took me days of cooperation with technicians and hours of work, asking back and forward and finally testing it. And now it works.

I invite new subscribers to test and see! (he he he). No, in earnest: I’m happy to see more subscribers who’d like to see my newsletter. Thank you!

_________________________________________________________

 

 

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Picture courtesy of: http://www.google.com

A.J.’s Newsletter Trouble

This morning I posted the following blog post, happily, that finally my newsletter subscription works. It took me a long time to get this done and follow all necessary steps I was given to make it work again. Of course, I had tested subscribing and unsubscribing before publishing the article. It worked perfectly, which made me publish the article.

And as soon as the post was published I was informed that it does not work.

I’m shocked. This is embarrassing, and I’m extremely unhappy how it turned out. I just wrote an armor-clad email to MailChimp to immediately solve that problem.

I’m contrite and hope you’ll forgive me for publishing something that does not work. I’m sorry.

I’ll keep you updated on the matter.

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Picture courtesy of: http://www.google.com

Author Spotlight – Wendy Unsworth

Welcome! 

Please introduce yourself. 

Hello and thank you so much for inviting me here today.

My name is Wendy Unsworth. I am originally from Lincolnshire in the north east of England but I haven’t lived there since my twenties. A lifelong love and curiosity about travel has taken me and my family to many places and for thirteen years we lived in Central and East  Africa. We returned to England and spent some years in Cornwall and made our home in a cottage that was built in 1750. There are good and bad points in living in such an old property, but mostly good! These days I spend my time between Scotland  and the wilds of Portugal as we have family in both of those countries.

 

  1. When did you start writing?

Reading interviews such as these, it’s interesting to note that most authors tend to say that they have dabbled with writing  for as long as they can remember and I’m no different. I always kept diaries and journals as a child and in my early teens wrote a story several notebooks long about a man accused of robbery in eighteenth century  England. He’s forced to flee the country to avoid the hangman’s noose and has several adventures before proving his innocence.

I don’t know what finally happened to those notebooks but suffice to say the historical accuracy was based on old films about pirates and highwaymen and therefore wildly inaccurate! I do so love a well crafted and well researched historical book and admire those who research and capture a particular period so well that they can transport their readers. Mine was not in any way like that,  but it was good writing practice!

 

  1. What motivates you to write?

Oh! Tricky. I suppose it’s creativity that needs to find some kind of form. I love to knit and sew, make home furnishings and create lovely and dramatic gardens. Writing books is at the heart of that love, creating with words. The best part of writing though is that you can actually do it in your head, while you’re washing up or driving or knitting or sewing – creative multi-tasking!

 

  1. What genre do you write in and what made you choose this particular genre?

I choose to write in the genres I most love to read, for my own pleasure and for reading aloud to children.

The stories I write are about testing my characters, about what they can come up with when the chips are down. They’re about murder and family secrets, good and bad people. They probably cross some lines between murder mystery and psychological thriller and although I know genres are supposed to be a little more fixed than that, my characters don’t seem to be able to comply.

As a complete change, I also have a series of chapter books for children which are both magical and mad cap. 

 

  1. What is your goal in writing? Do you have dreams where your writing should take you?

My goal is my next book. My W.I.P. is always my big dream and I can’t wait to finish it. As far as longer term dreams, to write books that can give real pleasure. I hope that others can find genuine enjoyment in the stories I tell. To have someone say, Wow! That is such a good story, I really connected with it; that means a lot.

 

  1. Do you ever suffer from writer’s block and if yes, how do you deal with it?

Oh every day! Seriously though, my daily writing sessions seem to stop-start, that is, I find flow and then get stuck, find it again for a while and then get stuck again. It’s just that way with me.

Since discovering Scrivener that problem has been a little easier to overcome. I split my latest project (manuscript) into documents on a cork board.  For my WIP at the moment, Dirty Work, the action is split into days (Day one, Day Two…) and those days are split into action and POV changes.

When I get stuck I try to unstick myself but if some point is really holding me back I just flip to another document and pick up the action elsewhere in the book. It means I can give myself a break from the sticking point and also that I am still getting some words on the page which is good for morale. 

 

  1. What advice would you like to give new, hopeful authors?

I would say, keep your chin up!

Do not listen to naysayers who quote impossible odds at you. If you want to write, write.

If you want to sell the books you write, inform yourself. Read the many blog posts and articles out there; authors are generous in sharing what does and does not work for them.

As far as social media is concerned be okay with the fact that you can’t do everything.

Love books and read them. 

 

  1. Please, tell us about your work.

Thank you. I would love to tell you a little bit about my work so far.

My Berriwood books are a series based around the fictional community of Berriwood. It’s a small Cornish village where people tend to know one another and nothing much ever happens. It’s ordinary people living ordinary lives, until…

There is always an until’!

 

Here they are with a little bit of blurb about each:

 

The Palaver Tree. (Book 1)

 

Gabriel Cole is a brilliant man. He’s clever; a tireless campaigner for his own charitable foundation. He’s good looking and charming and he takes care of everyone he meets. Ask anyone.

Ask Ellie who travels all the way to Africa to work for him.

Ask Tiffany who plans to marry him.

Ask Promise who loves him or Diane who admires him.

But don’t ask Pax… she knows something.

 

From a quaint Cornish village to the dust and heat of Africa. If good people would talk to one another, the truth could be told.

 

************************************

 

Beneathwood  (Book 2)

This time the action stays close to home:-

 

Beryl Carroll has lived in the Cornish village of Berriwood for so long that it’s easy to forget she wasn’t born there.

It’s easy… and it’s better.

She fled to the village, a young girl, in search of Gordon, her lost love and in an attempt to escape her sister and her mother and the terrible thing they had all done.

She should have told Gordon what happened, he had a right to know. But what if he couldn’t forgive her? What if he sent her away?

Time has healed, it has banished the past to a few, secret memories but when the couple move into to Beneathwood, the rambling old house on the edge of the village, strange things begin to happen and Beryl has the feeling that the truth is back, welcome or not..

 

************************************

 

Dirty Work (Book 3)

 

Appearances can be deceptive.

Take the Duke twins. Pete lost his IT job almost two years ago; he is best known in his native village of Berriwood for his tendency to be found propped up against a bar somewhere… or under it. It has been a tough time for Caroline, Pete’s wife,  but at last, it seems he is turning things around.

Nathan is the success story of the family, the darling of the local amateur dramatic society who gave it all up for his high flying directorship based in London. But his wife, Marcie hates the lonely days while he works  away  and forgetting her birthday is the last straw.

 

When Nathan invites Caroline and Pete to a surprise birthday dinner for Marcie, to make amends, Caroline has her reservations. She knows  if anyone is going to spoil the party it would be Pete; he has done it plenty of times before.  What she doesn’t  anticipate is that her husband  won’t even be there and that one of the four will very soon be dead…

 

This is my newest work in the series, available on Amazon for pre-order from May 17th 2017 and due to be published on June 16th 2017. 

 

Thank you for being my guest. It was such a pleasure to have you here!!

 

I am so grateful to have been invited to your lovely blog. Thank you for having me

 ________________________________________________________________________________________________

Connect with Wendy:

 

Website – http://wendyunsworth.wordpress.com

Twitter – https://twitter.com/WendyUnsworth

Facebook – www.facebook.com/WendyUnsworthAuthor

 

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Wendy’s Books:

 

The Palaver Tree.   http://getBook.at/Palaver

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beneathwood.       http://getBook.at/Beneathwood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dirty work:             AVAILABLE ON PRE-ORDER MAY 15 2017!!

 

Author Spotlight – Jack Brutus Penny

IMG_2668Welcome!

When did you start writing?

I started as an illustrator primarily and grew into writing. I moved from free-lance graphic design to illustrating my own work in 2012, though I’ve been both drawing and writing since I can remember, having won artwork, essay writing, and poetry competitions as a child. I may be most proud of my Blue Peter appearance and badge I received for an essay, though perhaps only the British readers will appreciate its significance.

 

 

What motivates you to write?

Everything and anything out of the ordinary. That which makes me pause in wonder, or strikes me by how wonderful it would be, were it so. I particularly like scenes of times and places somehow connected to us but distant enough to fade into antiquity.

 

What genre do you write in and what made you chose this particular genre?

I write in nonsense and linguistics. As a dyslexic English lecturer living in Japan I have developed a deep understanding of a language that baffles me. Japanese is hard too. But English in its flexibility serves me possibly more than any other language could, as a tool to be molded until it’s broken and shaped until it’s bent completely out. I prefer to allow the language to help my stories take shape, as long as it isn’t a pear’s.

 

What is your goal in writing? Do you have dreams where your writing should take you?

My goal is to create world’s in which people enjoy the playground of the English language, its etymologies, its idiomatic expressiveness, to both amuse and cultivate the brighter mind.

 

Do you ever suffer from writer’s block and if yes, how do you deal with it?

I do. But I work on a variety of projects at a time, and within each project I work on the text, the illustrations, the formatting, and so on, so if ever something seems wholly unwilling, I change my focus until I can catch it off-guard. Some of my best ideas come from when I shrewdly caught them unalert.

 

What advice would you like to give new, hopeful authors?

Everybody has his or her own approach to creativity. Some profess to reading, but I say be selective. If there is a story you want to write, find someone who you think would most competently tell it, and study him or her carefully. My companions range from Lewis Carroll to Bruegel. It’s strange how we find our voice from listening to others’.

 

Please, tell us about your work.

I’m working currently on a few projects: a collection of sixteen short stories called In Truth Stories, a collection of parables and fables called The Allegaurus, and now marketing a recently released book of 200 riddles, ‘some rather difficult, and others unreasonably so’, From the Riddle Me Collection Volume One: A Stone’s Throw.

 

Thank you for being my guest. It was such a pleasure to have you here!!

 


 

Connect with Jack Brutus Penny:

Website: www.jackbrutuspenny.com

where you can find Jack’s blog for example. Discover it!

 


Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000035_00013]Jack’s Book:

Website shop page for the book

The book on Amazon.com

The book on Amazon.co.uk